People (not perks) matter most when it comes to happiness at work

People spend a majority of their lives working. That means happiness at work isn’t just something nice to have, it’s critical. So what do employees value most in the workplace that helps them achieve it? To find out, we asked. And the answer surprised us.

You might think it would a popular company perk—unlimited vacation, free snacks, on-site medical services, or gym facilities—but the real secret to a happy work life is something more intangible. Many employees said happiness at work is a result of the authentic team relationships they build day in and day out.

Turns out what matters most isn’t perks, but who you’re working alongside to achieve something great. Below, several of our colleagues share who (and what) makes their day:

Lisa Caputo, a lithography manufacturing technician at the D1C Fab in Hillsboro shared that her team is the number one reason she looks forward to coming to work every day.

“I love the lighthearted individuals I work with. We banter with one another and make sure we give emotional and technical support when needed.”

For Lisa, every day at Intel is an adventure. She enjoys the challenge of solving project roadblocks, and having a strong team to rely on is one of the most important and fulfilling aspects of her job.

“I am surrounded by the most intelligent and intellectual individuals in the world. Without my colleagues and their personalities, I would just work in a factory with remarkable technology.”

Megha Aggarwal, a software engineer at the Systems Research Center in Bangalore, India, says the most exciting part of work is what she and her team can accomplish together.

“It is really exciting to be part of a team that aims to be best-in-class by exceeding the market requirements and getting ahead of competitors. It is wonderful to have new challenges to strive to achieve.”

Megha is proud to be a part of a group where everyone respects and encourages each other. It’s a motivating environment where each person has room to be the best they can be.

“Integrity, value for individuals, work/life balance, and great teams are some of our key values. The passion to achieve the best and set higher goals to exceed performance with lower power consumption drives [our] success.”

Cory Ilo, a design validation engineer and computer vision enthusiast at headquarters in Santa Clara, California, shares that his team’s excellence makes him proud to come to work and be a brand ambassador.

“Intel is world renowned for its ability to create high-quality silicon products. My team makes sure the quality of these products is the best we can offer. We do a lot of the validation work to ensure they work correctly. I’m proud to be one of the bastions that protects Intel’s bottom line and its reputation.”

For Cory, every day at Intel is an opportunity to experience something new, and it’s supportive leadership he appreciates most.

“I enjoy the flexibility of my work day and my awesome manager. I’m allowed to float (within reason). This means I can deliver for Intel and balance my life outside of work at the same time, no conflicts.”

Why does happiness at work matter?

There is no “magic formula” for a happy and fulfilling work life, but the right colleagues can turn challenges into discovery and problems into triumph.

Innovation isn’t easy, but everyone who works at Intel is passionate about creating new technologies and enabling great experiences. That’s why we value camaraderie here. It builds stronger teams, more collaborative groups, and – ultimately – happier people.

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “People (not perks) matter most when it comes to happiness at work

  1. hello my name is catie is there anyway I could work for you from home? I live in Westland michigan.

  2. Yesterday I celebrated my 30th anniversary being at Intel. After reading the article above (“People (not Perks) matter most….), I want to say the premise is true. I’m not here to climb a ladder but to do great work with people I consider my daytime family. I know many people who would agree

  3. I always used to be apprehensive of sharing personal talks and happenings at work. That was and is still a stigma in most places. But when we spend half of our time awake with people we work, it is sometimes just fine to discuss your problems with them. Atleast from my personal experience i have learnt that being the real me at work is actually helping me get better inside out! That tinge of comfort with your colleagues again stems from the kind of rapport, both personal and professional that you share with them.

Comments are closed.

Interested in a job @ Intel?