SUB2r customizable video camera gets its video pipeline programmability and configurability from an FPGA powered by four Intel® Enpirion® Power Systems on Chip (PowerSoC) modules

SUB2r, a self-funded startup makes a video camera for storytellers and gamers who want to create compelling video content. The company had a problem: visible current noise was marring the images coming from its eponymous video camera. The SUB2r camera is really a video computing platform with a configurable, customizable, upgradeable, programmable, open-architecture imaging pipeline based on an FPGA-based implementation. The camera derives its operating power from the attached USB 3.0 cable, which limits the camera’s power supply input to 5 volts at 3 amps. The camera’s original, internal voltage down-converter design was injecting a significant amount of noise into the circuitry, which resulted in a noisy image.

 

 

The SUB2r customizable video camera gets its video pipeline programmability and configurability from an FPGA that’s powered by four Intel® Enpirion® Power Systems on Chip (PowerSoC) modules.

 

SUB2r called in an expert power-conversion team from Intel for help. The team helped SUB2r redesign the camera’s on-board voltage regulation using four Intel® Enpirion® Power System on a Chip (PowerSoC) devices: the EN5319QI, EN5329QI, EN5339QI, and EN6340QI PowerSoCs. These four Intel Enpirion PowerSoC modules generate the four on-board power supplies required by the FPGA:

 

  • 1 volt at 3 amps
  • 5 volts at 3 amps
  • 8 volts at 1 amp
  • 5 volts at 2 amps

 

After the power supply was redesigned using the Intel Enpirion PowerSoCs, visible current noise in the camera’s video output stream became undetectable. As a bonus, current consumption drawn over the USB 3.0 power/data cable dropped from 3 amps to 1.6 amps and the passively cooled camera’s internal operating temperature dropped from 58° C to 41° C due to the improved power supply efficiency. The reduced internal operating temperature should improve camera reliability, as it would in any electronic system – like yours.

The design team at SUB2r was so impressed by the overall result that they made a short “thank you” video for the Intel Enpirion team that helped with the redesign. You’ll find that video here.

If you are facing tough power-conversion challenges, think about the results that SUB2r achieved and then consider giving the Intel Enpirion team a call. They’re here to help.

 

 

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Published on Categories Enpirion, Video, VisionTags , ,
Steven Leibson

About Steven Leibson

Be sure to add the Intel Logic and Power Group to your LinkedIn groups. Steve Leibson is a Senior Content Manager at Intel. He started his career as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He’s served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine and Microprocessor Report and was the founding editor of Wind River’s Embedded Developers Journal. He has extensive design and marketing experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.