Recent Blog Posts

Finding your new Intel SSD for PCIe (think NVMe, not SCSI)

Sometimes we see customers on Linux wondering where their new NVMe capable SSD is on the Linux filesystem. It’s not in the standard place on the Linux filesystem in ‘/dev/sd*’ like all those scsi devices of the past 20+ years. So how come, where is it? For all of you new to the latest shipping Intel SSD’s for PCIe, they run on the NVMe storage controller protocol, and not the scsi protocol. That’s actually a big deal because that means efficiency and a protocol appropriate for “non-volatile memories” (NVM). Our newest P3700 and related drives will use the same, industry standard, and open source NVMe kernel driver. This driver drives I/O to the device and is part of the block driver subsystem of the linux kernel.


So maybe it is time to refresh on some not too familiar or oft-used linux administrative commands to see a bit more. The simple part is to look in “/dev/nvme*”. The devices will be numbered and the actual block device will have an n1 on the end, to support NVMe namespaces. So if you have one PCIe card or front-loading 2.5″ drive, you’ll have /dev/nvme0n1 as a block device to format, partition and use.


These important Data Center Linux distributions:

Red Hat 6.5/7.0

SUSE 11 SP2

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS


…all have in box nvme storage drivers, so you should be set if you are at these levels or newer.


Below are some basic Linux instructions and snapshots to give you a bit more depth. This is Red Hat/CentOS 6.5 distro relevant data below.


#1

Are the drives in my system scan the pci and block devices:

[root@fm21vorc10 ~]$ lspci | grep 0953

04:00.0 Non-Volatile memory controller: Intel Corporation Device 0953 (rev 01)

05:00.0 Non-Volatile memory controller: Intel Corporation Device 0953 (rev 01)

48:00.0 Non-Volatile memory controller: Intel Corporation Device 0953 (rev 01)

49:00.0 Non-Volatile memory controller: Intel Corporation Device 0953 (rev 01)

 

[root@fm21vorc07 ~]# lsblk

NAME        MAJ:MIN RM  SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT

sda 8:0    0  372G  0 disk

─sda1 8:1    0    10G  0 part /boot

─sda2 8:2    0  128G  0 part [SWAP]

└─sda3        8:3 0  234G  0 part /

nvme0n1    259:0    0 372.6G  0 disk

└─nvme0n1p1 259:1    0 372.6G  0 part

#2

Is the nvme driver built into my kernel:

[root@fm21vorc10 ~]$ modinfo nvme

filename: /lib/modules/3.15.0-rc4/kernel/drivers/block/nvme.ko

version:        0.9

license:        GPL

author:        Matthew Wilcox <willy@linux.intel.com>

srcversion:    4563536D4432693E6630AE3

alias: pci:v*d*sv*sd*bc01sc08i02*

depends:

intree:        Y

vermagic:      3.15.0-rc4 SMP mod_unload modversions

parm: io_timeout:timeout in seconds for I/O (byte)

parm: nvme_major:int

parm: use_threaded_interrupts:int

 

#3

Is my driver actually loaded into the kernel

[root@fm21vorc10 ~]$ lsmod | grep nvm

nvme 54197  0

 

#4

Are my nvme block devices present:

[root@fm21vorc10 ~]$ ll /dev/nvme*n1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 259, 0 Oct  8 21:05 /dev/nvme0n1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 259, 1 Sep 25 17:08 /dev/nvme1n1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 259, 2 Sep 25 17:08 /dev/nvme2n1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 259, 3 Sep 25 17:08 /dev/nvme3n1

 

#5

Run a quick test to see if you have a GB/s class SSD to have fun with.

[root@fm21vorc07 ~]# hdparm -tT –direct /dev/nvme0n1

 

/dev/nvme0n1:

Timing O_DIRECT cached reads:  3736 MB in  2.00 seconds = 1869.12 MB/sec

Timing O_DIRECT disk reads: 5542 MB in  3.00 seconds = 1847.30 MB/sec


Remember to consolidate and create parallelism as much as possible in your workloads.These drives will amaze you.


Have fun!


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How IT killed the auto insurance market

Automobiles are becoming smart.  And the more that IT is implemented into vehicles, the more car insurance companies will need to worry.  


Recently, reports and studies of “driverless vehicles” have sparked public interest while encouraging the development and integration of smart technology in vehicles.  Today, we have cars and trucks that are not only able to drive themselves, but they can now talk to one another.

Hello Megatron!

crash.jpgWhile this technology becomes more and more prevalent in the public market, there will be a major increase in self-driving cars.  As a result, many of the everyday driving risks will disappear. Let’s imagine for a second… Speed limits will no longer be broken. Traffic jams will no longer occur. Road rage will not exist. Drowsy drivers can now take naps as their vehicles take them safely to their destination.  Having lunch in the car, which was once limited to a cheeseburger in one hand and a soda between the legs, can now consist of a good bowl of soup with the use of a spoon – clearly a two-handed operation.

Want to use your cell phone by dialing or texting?  Go ahead.  Applying makeup? No problem.  Teenage drivers? A ok. 

 

With an actual driver no longer being required, age restrictions for licenses will not be necessary.  In fact, licenses themselves will no longer be necessary.  In essence, the car becomes a device much like a smartphone or tablet. 

The best news of all: no more auto insurance needed.  With the elimination of human error, bodily injuries and accidents – what will we need to be covered for? Simply put, auto insurance companies will no longer be in business.

What does that mean for us?  No more commercials featuring Geckos, Flo or Cavemen.


Well that’s just better news.  One can only dream right?

 

Doc

 

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Bringing Electronic Checklists to Healthcare

Doctors and surgeons are some of the brightest individuals in the world. However, no one is immune to mistakes and simple oversights. Unintentional errors occur in any industry; what makes healthcare different is that a single misstep could cost a life. 

 

In, The Checklist Manifesto by Dr. Atul Gawande, he cites a fellow surgeon’s story of a seemingly routine stab wound.  The patient was at a costume party when he got into an altercation that led to the stabbing.  As the team prepared to treat the wound, the patient’s vitals began dropping rapidly. The surgeon and his team were unaware that the weapon was a bayonet that went more than a foot through the man, piecing his aorta.

 

After regaining control of the situation, the man recovered after a few days. This experience presented complications that no one could possibly predict unless the doctors had full knowledge of the situation.  Gawande states, “everyone involved got almost every step right […] except no one remembered to ask the patient or the medical technicians what the weapon was” (Gawande 3). There are many independent variables to account for; a standard checklist for incoming stab wound patients could ensure that episodes like this are avoided and that other red flags would be accounted for. 

 

Miscommunication between clinicians and patients annually accounts for roughly 800,000 deaths in the US, more than heart disease and more than cancer.  The healthcare industry spends roughly $8 billion on extended care as a result of clinical error every year. As accountable care continues to make progress, the healthcare industry is moving more towards evidence based medicine and best practices. This is certainly the case for care providers, but also for patients as well. 

 

Implementing checklists in all aspects of healthcare can eliminate simple mistakes and common oversights by medical professionals and empower patients to become more educated and informed. Studies by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) as well as the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) have concluded that implementing checklists in various facets of care can reduce errors by up to half. Certain implementations of checklists in Intensive Care Units for infection mitigation resulted in reducing infections by 100 percent.

 

Compelling evidence of the need for checklisting can be found in the preparation process for a colonoscopy.  Colonoscopy preparation is a rigorous process that requires patients to be watching their diet and the clock for two days before procedure.  It is not uncommon for a colonoscopy to fail due to inadequate patient preparation. Before the procedure, the patient must pay attention to an arsenal of instructions regarding food, liquid, and medication. A detailed checklist that guides each patient through the process would practically eliminate any errors and failures due to inadequate patient preparation. 

 

From the patient’s perspective, checklisting everything from pre-surgery preparation to a routine checkup should be a priority.   At the end of the day, the patient has the most at stake and should be entitled to a clear, user-friendly system to understand every last detail of any procedure or treatment.

 

A couple of companies are making waves in the area of patient safety checklists, most notably of which are BluMenlo and Parallax.

 

BluMenlo is a mobile patient safety firm founded in 2012. Its desktop, tablet, and mobile solution drives utilization of checklists for patient handoffs, infection mitigation, and Radiation Oncology Machine QA. Although initial focus is in the areas mentioned, BluMenlo is expanding into standardizing best practices hospital and ACO-wide.

 

Parallax specializes in operating room patient safety. Its CHaRM offering incorporates a Heads Up Display to leverage checklists in the Operating Room. The software learns a surgeon’s habits and techniques to accurately predict how long an operation may take as well as predict possible errors.

 

Electronic checklists will certainly take hold as health systems, ACOs and accountable care networks continue to focus on increased patient safety, improved provider communications and best practices for reducing costs across their organizations. We will even see these best practices expedited if we begin to inquire with our care providers as informed and engaged patients.

 

What questions about checklists do you have?

 

As a healthcare executive and strategist, Justin Barnes is an industry and technology advisor who also serves as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Georgia Tech’s Advanced Technology Development Center. In addition, Mr. Barnes is Chairman Emeritus of the HIMSS EHR Association as well as Co-Chairman of the Accountable Care Community of Practice.

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Buying A New Device? Don’t Get Shortchanged On Your Wireless Speeds

Even with new 802.11ac wireless technology available to device manufacturers, many companies are still putting older, slower 802.11bgn wireless cards in their devices. From laptops to smart TVs, it’s important to know exactly what you’re getting before you buy. 802.11b/g/n … Read more >

The post Buying A New Device? Don’t Get Shortchanged On Your Wireless Speeds appeared first on Technology@Intel.

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What Is Business Intelligence?

What Is Business Intelligence?Early in my career, I was encouraged to always ask questions, even the  most obvious and simple ones. This included questions about well-known topics that were assumed to be understood by everyone. With that in mind, let’s answer the question, “What is business intelligence (BI)?”

 

As you read this post, you probably fall into one of these three categories:

  1. You know exactly what BI is because you eat, sleep, and breathe it every day. BI is in your business DNA.
  2. The term means nothing more than the name of an exotic tech cocktail that might have pierced your ears, figuratively speaking of course.
  3. You‘re somewhere in between the two extremes. You’ve been exposed to the term, but haven’t had a chance yet to fully digest it or appreciate it.

 

Do you have something to learn about BI? Let’s roll up our sleeves and get to work.

 

To begin with, BI looked very different when I started my career in the early ’90s. You couldn’t look it up on a mobile device smaller than a floppy disk. Moreover, you couldn’t Google it, Bing it, or Yahoo it. Today, the keywords “business” and “intelligence” together return more than 250 million results on Google, though few will be relevant to you, nor will you have time to go through them. Nevertheless, the ease and the speed at which you are able to query large volumes of recorded data to make faster, better-informed conclusions puts the question at hand in perspective.

 

Scratching the surface

 

Beginners to BI should start their research with the definition. Wikipedia’s definition of BI is a good place to start, and from it you get the sense that BI includes tangibles such as hardware and software as well as intangibles such as people, culture, processes, and best practices. Continuing on the Wikipedia page, you can find out about the origins of the term. In 1958, Hans Peter Luhn, an IBM researcher, defined the term as “the ability to apprehend the interrelationships of presented facts in such a way as to guide action towards a desired goal.” By the ‘90s, the term had become more widespread. At CIO.com, BI is defined as “an umbrella term that refers to a variety of software applications used to analyze an organization’s raw data.”

 

Digging deeper

 

Next, you can dig a little deeper by performing what I call a rapid-research exercise to glance at the websites of BI companies that develop the technology. In this way, your searches can transition from text-based and definition-centric explanations to visually rich and appealing presentations, including graphs and charts. This is where BI dashboards take center stage. Not surprisingly, the emphasis on mobile that showcases tablets and smart phones becomes apparent by pictures of BI artifacts shown on mobile devices. Additional references pop up for Big Data and Cloud. Both are hot technology terms that have gained popularity in the last few years. As you research and connect the dots, you can start to build your own definition of BI. This will be influenced by your own unique background, your experiences with technology (with or without BI), and possibly, your personal perceptions layered with your biases of BI. However, in the end, your definition may still fall short.

 

Hitting the core

 

Ultimately, BI is about decision making. In its simplest and purest form, I define BI as the framework that enables organizations of all sizes to make faster, better-informed business decisions.


I don’t claim that this particular definition of BI is better or more comprehensive than others. But it does provide a direct and concise answer with less emphasis on technology and more focus on business, people, and decision making.

 

When it comes to defining BI or technology in general, we need to put the focus on business and people more often. In this context, business decisions should be complemented by technology that promotes actionable insight, and not the other way around. BI is not a miracle pill.

 

BI alone does not solve business problems or cure corporate infections. Instead, BI is the enabler that, if designed, implemented, and executed effectively, can help organizations drive growth and profitability.

 

What is your definition of BI?

 

Connect with me on Twitter (@KaanTurnali) and LinkedIn.

 

This story originally appeared on the The Decision Factor.

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Next Generation of CIOs Drive a New Style of Business

“The worst place to be as a CIO is to convince yourself you have control, when in fact you don’t,” says Intel CIO, Kim Stevenson in this interview on ComputerWeekly.com.  Stevenson hates the term Shadow IT – she views this as the enterprise at large becoming more educated about technology just like we continue to do in our personal lives.  Stevenson’s outlook symbolizes a new style of interaction with business stakeholders that is vital for competitive enterprises of the future.  It is no longer just about how CIOs help their stakeholders achieve their business objectives – it is also about the manner in which they present solutions in business terms. CIOs of tomorrow must drive a New Style of Business today across the enterprise.  Let us see what we can learn from the next generation of CIOs like Intel’s Stevenson.

 

Kim Stevenson.jpg

Twentieth Century Fox Executive CP and CIO, John Herbert, introduced the term Journey Management at HP Discover.  By realizing business gains for his stakeholders through clearly defined metrics, Herbert is delivering Enterprise IT at the pace of Business.  Through Herbert’s words, Enterprise IT at Fox is a “Service Broker” today instead of an order-taker.  This enables business functions that matter most to his stakeholders.

 

In this CIO.com interview, HP Enterprise Services CIO, Steve Bandrowczak calls out a powerful but rarely mentioned quality for the New Style of CIOs: humility.  The humble CIO will emphasize his people’s importance more than his own. It is the same mindset that drove leaders like Gandhi, Lincoln and Mother Teresa to make big data matter and make a difference in the global enterprise.

 

This mindset drives a spirit of co-opetition rather than competition with other stakeholders.  No wonder Stevenson suggests that CIOs who have worked in a control style of IT service must relinquish control in situations where IT cannot add any value.

 

Stevenson also shares an example of presenting IT solution in business terms.  Rather than letting business peers know that you have a team of Data Scientists who can work magic, she suggests: “How about if you say, ‘We can create a $10m return on investment in six months?’”. This approach was applied to the Resller SMART project. Her team used advanced analytics to provide insights about which customers were most likely to buy. The project delivered $20M in one year.

 

These are powerful messages from CIOs who integrate the business of IT every day. What is interesting is that they are still operating under the fundamental premise of Enterprise IT, enabling the business units to achieve their business objectives.  There is nothing intrinsically new about this premise. But, they are doing this with a different style of thinking and interaction that characterizes a New Style of Leadership to drive a New Style of Business.

 

How about you?  What are other characteristics you would suggest to drive this new style of business?  .

 

Team up with HP Technology Expert, E.G.Nadhan

 

Connect with Nadhan on: Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Journey Blog


References:


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Latin America Jumps into the Parallel Universe Computing Challenge

Mike Bernhardt is the Community Evangelist for Intel’s Technical Computing Group

 

At our inaugural Parallel Universe Computing Challenge (PUCC) at SC13, we had no representatives from Latin America. That’s changed for the 2014 PUCC with the proposed participation of a team representing supercomputing interests in Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, Mexico and Venezuela.

Several of the team members are from the Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS) in Bucaramanga, Colombia. UIS, a research university, is the home of the Super Computing and Scientific Computing lab that also provides HPC training for Latin American and Caribbean countries—which is why they were able to garner additional team members from universities in other countries.

The lab’s research is focused on such science and applied science areas as bioinformatics and computational chemistry, materials and corrosion, condensed matter physics, astronomy and astrophysics; and on computer science areas including visualization and cloud computing, modeling and simulation, scheduling and optimization, concurrency and parallelism, and energy-aware advanced computing.

 

We talked with team captain Gilberto Díaz, Infrastructure chief of the supercomputer center at UIS, about the team he was assembling.

Q: Why did the team from Latin America decide to participate in the PUCC?
A: We would like to promote and develop more widespread awareness and use of HPC in our region. In addition to the excitement of participating in the 2014 event, our participation will help us to prepare students of master and PhD programs to better understand the importance of code modernization as well as preparing them to compete in future competitions.

Q: How will your team prepare for the Intel PUCC?
A: All of us work in HPC and participate in scientific projects where we have the opportunity to develop our skills.

Q: What are the most prevalent high performance computing applications in which your team members are involved?
A: We are developers, therefore, we are most familiar with programming languages than specific applications (MPI, CUDA, OpenMP).

Q: SC14 is using the theme “HPC Matters” for the conference. Can you explain why “HPC Matters” to you?
A: HPC is a fundamental tool to face some challenging problems and solving them will represent a significant advance for humanity, for example, new drug development for disease treatment, high tech components for cars, planes, etc., weather simulations to understand how we are affecting the climate of the world, etc.

Q: What is the significance of your team name (“SC3”)?
A: Super Computing and Scientific Computing in Spanish is Super Computación y Calculo Cientifico, which is the name of the lab at the Universidad Industrial de Santander.

Q: Who are your team members?
A: We have six people in addition to myself so far:

  • Robinson Rivas, Professor at Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV) and director of the supercomputer center of UCV in Caracas
  • Carlos Barrios, Professor at Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS) and director of the supercomputer center of UIS
  • Pedro Velho, Professor at Universidad Federal de Rio Grande del Sur in Porto Alegre, Brazil
  • Alvaro de la Ossa, Professor at Universidad de Costa Rica in San Jose, Costa Rica
  • Jesus Verduzco, Professor at Instituto Politécnico de Colima in Colima, Mexico
  • Monica Hernandez, System Engineer and student in Master program at UIS

 

Learn more about the PUCC at SC14.

 

(Left to Right) Pedro Velho, Carlos Barrios, Robinson Rivas, Gilberto Díaz


Jesus Verduzco

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Part 3 – Transforming the Workplace: Driving Innovation with Technology

This is part 3 of my blog series about transforming the workplace. Be sure to start with part 1 and part 2, and look for future posts in the series.


Imagine how your day might look in the workplace of the future. Your computer knows your face (it’s how you log in); it responds to your gestures; and it knows your voice. You connect, dock, and charge your personal computing device by simply sitting there, without the need for any wires. Even better, your computer becomes the assistant you never had. That 11 a.m. client meeting on your calendar? There’s an accident blocking the fastest route, so you’ll need to leave 20 minutes earlier. You didn’t know this, but your PC figured it out and told you by making contextual insights into your schedule. And this is just the tip of the iceberg.

 

Between this future-state vision and where we are today lies a transformational journey. And it’s never easy. In my last blog, I discussed how the nature and style of work is changing to support the need to innovate with velocity. To achieve true transformation, companies must overcome many barriers to change, from the cultural and environmental to the technological. Here I want to take a closer look at some of the technological leaps that will make the transformation possible, both in terms of where we are now and where we’re going.

 

Supporting natural, immersive collaboration

We all know that social, mobile, analytics, and cloud (SMAC) has changed things. Because today’s workforce is distributed across sites, cities, and even countries, collaboration can be a real challenge—a scenario exacerbated with the advent of agile practices working across company boundaries.

 

Take a typical brainstorming session, for example. Using a whiteboard to sketch out ideas is key, but it has limitations for workers attending by phone. Someone either has to explain what’s on the whiteboard, copy the work into meeting notes, or take a photo of the whiteboard and e-mail it. Not to mention that the picture, possibly of your company’s “next great idea,” uploads to your favorite public cloud provider. And while videoconferencing would seem a likely alternative here, video quality can be lackluster at best.

 

Intel is taking an innovative approach to solve these challenges. Advanced collaboration technologies will let workers connect in an intuitive, natural way—whether it’s a global team, a small group, or a simple one-on-one session. Unified communications with HD audio and video (complete with live background masking) is already changing videoconferencing with a more lifelike experience. And workers can interact in real time using a shared, multitouch interactive whiteboard that spans devices, from tablets to projection screens and everything in between. The whiteboard is visible and accessible to all attendees in real time. And that digital business assistant? One day it could even use natural language voice recognition to automatically transcribe meeting notes and track actions!

 

productivity.png

 

Boosting personal productivity

When it comes to productivity, the devil is in the details. And often those details translate into lost time, whether it’s a dead laptop battery or a password issue. Let’s say you forget your password and you can’t log in without IT assistance. It’s a drag on your time (and theirs), but it’s also interrupting workflow. Sharing work can also take longer than it should. We’ve all been there, in the conference room, stuck without the right adapter for the projector (“the thing that connects to the thing”). And if you can’t project, there’s not an easy way to share work.

 

Intel is making great strides to free workers from these burdens of computing by supporting existing workflows for maximum productivity.

  • A workplace without wiresbuilt-in wireless display now allows workers to connect automatically
  • “You are your password”
  • And getting back to that assistant … it will know you. Instead of having to tell your device everything, the reverse will be true. We foresee a day when your PC will know where you are, what you like, and what you need (like leaving early for that meeting). By anticipating your needs with proactive, contextual recommendations and powerful voice recognition, it will be able to streamline your day. And built-in theft protection will automatically measure proximity and motion to assess risk levels if you’re on the go.

 

Implementing facilities innovation

While we are “getting by” in today’s workspaces, they typically don’t meet the needs of a distributed workforce and can pose problems even for those working on site. It’s often a challenge to find a free conference room or, if one is available, the room itself is hard to find. I touched on videoconferencing earlier, but this is a place where the technology makes or breaks the deal. From poor quality audio and video to the wrong adapter, it all hampers workflow.

 

Intel is working to enable an integrated facilities experience through location-based services and embedded building intelligence. Location-based service capabilities on today’s PCs can help you find the resources you need based on current location, from people to conference rooms and printers. And like your PC will one day “know you,” so will the room, meaning it will automatically prepare for your meeting—connecting participants via video and distributing meeting notes. Immersive, high-quality audio and video will guarantee a natural, easy experience. And future installments of touch, gesture, and natural voice control will become more context aware, taking collaboration and productivity to the next level.

 

Moving forward

This perspective on the role of technology in driving workplace transformation can be seen in action by watching the Intel video, “The Near Future of Work.” Additionally, I’m currently working on a paper that will expand on Intel’s vision of workplace transformation, and I’ll let you know when it’s available.

However, while technology is a huge piece of the puzzle, there is so much more to it. True workplace transformation requires the right partnerships and culture change to be effective. For the next blog in this series, I’ll be taking a look at how to approach a strategy for workplace transformation and share key learnings from Intel’s own internal workplace program.

Meanwhile, please join the conversation and share your thoughts. And be sure to click over to the Intel® IT Center to find resources on the latest IT topics.

 

Until the next time …


Jim Henrys, Principal Strategist

Read more of my blogs here.

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How Intel apps are helping small farmers boost crops—and incomes

This post was written by Intel employee Nisha Desai, a writer who enjoys finding, shaping, and sharing great stories about Intel’s technology and people. She also manages a team of graphics whizzes dedicated to internal communications. Nisha joined Intel in 2008 after majoring … Read more >

The post How Intel apps are helping small farmers boost crops—and incomes appeared first on CSR@Intel.

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Patient Care 2020: More Technology on the Way

 

The year 2020 seems far off, but is closer than you think. With the increasing use of technology in healthcare, and with patient empowerment growing each year with the advent of mobile devices, what will a clinician’s workday look like five years from now?


In the above video, we turn toward the future to show you how enabling technologies that exist today will transform the way clinicians treat their patients in 2020. Learn how wearable devices, sensors, rich digital collaboration, social media, and personalized medicine through genomics will be part of a clinician’s daily workflow as we enter the next decade.

 

Watch the short video and let us know what questions you have about the future of healthcare technology and where you think it’s headed.

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