Recent Blog Posts

Intel and AT&T to Drive Research to Enable Software Defined Networking

Software defined networking (SDN) offers a new approach to network management and programmability for the purpose of enabling more flexible network architectures and agile service deployments. SDN introduces new standards and mechanisms to manage networks and quickly introduce new functionality … Read more >

The post Intel and AT&T to Drive Research to Enable Software Defined Networking appeared first on Intel Labs.

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Transform IT – Episode 3 Recap: The Curvy Path

During the latest episode of the Transform IT show, Patty Hatter, Sr. VP of Operations and CIO at McAfee, challenged us to take what I called, “the curvy path.” To be unafraid of having a career path that doesn’t look like a straight line. But the curvy path can be scary, right? The trick is in how you approach it.

 

Wasn’t it fun to hang out with Patty? What I love about her is that she is a no-nonsense, get-it-done executive who makes big things happen. But she also refuses to accept the status quo, is easy to talk to and she’s just a lot of fun to be with. What a powerful combination.

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And as I was talking to her, I couldn’t help but think that her own “curvy path” is a lot of the reason why.


As she explained during the interview, she is able to relate to all of her counterparts because she has been in their shoes, at least in part, at different times in her career. I think that kind of depth and breadth of experience gives you an inner confidence that allows you to drop your guard a bit. I think that inner confidence – and the easy manner it engenders – came through loud and clear when I was talking with Patty.

 

So her challenge to each of us was to be unafraid of our own curvy path. To be willing to step off the safe, straight and narrow career path that most of us have been on, and to be willing to try something completely new and different.

 

It’s scary. It’s risky. But it’s what will give you the depth of experience that you need to have that kind of inner confidence in almost any situation.

 

So how will you step off the safety of the straight path and seek out the less direct, but much more interesting path that will lead you forward? It may be an uncertain future, but by embracing the uncertainty and becoming an intellectual and experiential explorer, you can prepare yourself for whatever that future may hold.

 

So what will it be? What will be your first step off the straight, safe path onto your own “curvy path”?

 

Share that first step with us in the comments below or via Twitter using #TransformIT and #ITChat. Taking that step is a critical decision that will put you on the path to getting some amazing things done at the intersection of IT and business!

 

If you missed Episode 3, you can watch it on demand here.

 

Also, make sure that you tune in on October 28th when I’ll be talking to Frank Wander, former CIO at Guardian Life and Author of the book, Transforming IT Culture. We’ll be discussing the similarities between wine and culture from his own personal wine cellar! You’re not going to want to miss it. You can register for a calendar reminder here.

 

Join the Transform IT conversation anytime using the Twitter hashtags #TransformIT and #ITChat. Don’t forget that you can order my book, “The Quantum Age of IT” for 50% off thanks to the Intel IT Center: http://intel.ly/1pfz4tU

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How to Improve Hospital Efficiency

 

Efficiency is the goal for streamlined, affordable healthcare. But how do we get there?

 

In the above video, Gabi Daniely, vice president of Stanley Healthcare, talks about the company’s five hospital category solutions and how they can improve the operational efficiency of healthcare facilities.

 

How are you improving your facilities’ efficiency? Watch the clip and let us know what questions you have.

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Intel at SAP TechEd – Plan Your Schedule Now

SAP TechEd and && d-code Conference, coming to Las Vegas from Oct. 20 to 24, is SAP’s premier event for IT architects, administrators, and developers. With over 1,000 hours of instruction on SAP technologies, plus roll-outs of new tools and live coding InnoJams , this event is designed to help front-line IT pros address the real challenges they face every day. With hands-on training and lots of opportunities for networking and collaboration, this is one event where what happens in Las Vegas definitely won’t stay in Las Vegas!

 

Intel and SAP have shared a rich, innovation-based engineering collaboration for more than 8 years, and the relationship continues to evolve. The two companies worked together very closely during the development of SAP HANA*, the revolutionary in-memory database that powers real-time analytics and business solutions. The Intel® Xeon® Processor E7 Family and SAP HANA were co-optimized for superior performance, optimal reliability, enhanced security, and flexible management. Intel Xeon E7 is SAP HANA’s reference architecture design platform, and is the certified platform of choice for over 160 computing appliances with ten SAP HANA OEMs. Since we’re talking Las Vegas here, you can wager that the rich collaboration between SAP and Intel will continue—both companies are moving forward together with innovations for on-premises and cloud-based HANA platforms, and with solutions for enterprise mobility and the Internet of Things.

 

Intel has a full roster of keynote appearances, sessions, demos and other events at SAP TechEd, so start planning your itinerary now. Don’t miss the Steve Lucas SAP Executive Keynote (5:45pm-7pm, Oct. 20, Venetian Ballroom, Level 2). Steve Lucas, president of SAP Platform Solutions, is always an entertaining and enlightening speaker, and you can bet that he will kick off the show by unveiling some exciting announcements. Shannon Poulin, vice president of the Intel Datacenter Group, will join Steve on stage to discuss the latest in Intel and SAP ongoing collaboration, including news about SAP HANA in the cloud. With subscription-based SAP HANA now available via AWS and Virtustream, customers can try out SAP HANA in the cloud before investing in an on-site scale-up deployment.

 

Check out these technical sessions presented by Intel executives & experts:

  • DEV-114 Better Together (3:15-4:15pm, Oct. 21, Bellini 2103). Join Dietrich Banschbach,Intel director of SAP engineering, and learn how running SAP HANA on Intel Xeon E7 processors delivers up to 80 percent more performance and up to 80 percent lower TCO than alternative RISC architectures.
  • TEC212 Data Center Intelligence – SAP HANA Platform Extension for IT Departments (3:15-4:15pm, Oct 21, Lando 3202). Curt Aubley, Intel Data Center Group VP/CTO, will co-present with Nico Groh, SAP data center intelligence project owner. Learn about the ongoing Intel and SAP engineering effort to optimize SAP HANA power and performance on Intel® architecture and the enablement of Intel® Data Center Manager.
  • EXP17738 Accelerate the Performance of the SAP HANA Platform with Intel Architecture (4:30-5pm, Oct. 21, Lounge 3, Show Floor). Frank Ober, data center solution architect at Intel NV Memory Group, explains how Intel® Solid State Drives change the game for in-memory systems such as SAP HANA, where low-latency and parallel data movement is key.
  • EXP17764 Increase SAP HANA Data Security: Deploying the Vormetric Solution (1:30-2pm, Oct. 22, Lounge 3, Show Floor). Martin Guttmann, principal architect for Intel Data Center Solutions Worldwide, and Sri Sudarsan, director of engineering for Vormetric, highlight the business benefits and functional capabilities of deploying Vormetric data security solutions for data encryption on SAP HANA and Intel Xeon E7 platforms in a cloud-hosted infrastructure.

 

Stop by the Intel booth (#3000) to check out demos by Intel partners such as Fujitsu, SGI, and Lenovo, which showcase scale-up solutions built on the Intel Xeon E7 v2 platform. You’ll have a chance to experience Intel®-based tablets and 2-in-1 devices as secure platforms for SAP HANA mobile apps; meet SAP HANA Data Center Intelligence* (SAP HDCI), which integrates Intel® Data Center Manager with SAP HANA for improved power management; and discover 3D cameras built on Intel® RealSense™ sensory-input technologies.

 

We’ll also host almost 20 half-hour Tech Talks at our booth, so stop by for a chance to hear experts deliver quick overviews of the latest co-innovations from Intel and SAP. I’ll be there to help film the Tech Talks, and – get excited – I’ll feature several of these in an upcoming blog.

 

Follow me at @TimIntel and watch for my Vine videos and man-on-the-street commentary and impressions on SAP TechEd keynotes and Intel sessions. Follow @IntelITcenter and join the dialogue with Intel IT experts, and follow @IntelSoftware to engage with Intel’s software community.  

 

See you in Las Vegas!

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IT Leadership – How Do I Get There and How Do I Move Up?

As I look back at my career (no it’s not over ), I think on the important lessons I have learned. When I first started in IT, my first two promotions happened without any real involvement by me. I worked hard, did my job and my manager promoted me. I remember thinking this was great, but it was really my boss who was responsible for me being promoted.

 

All of a sudden, I noted that others who worked just as hard, were also getting promoted around me. As a result I wasn’t moving up as quickly as before, comparatively speaking. I began to spend time trying to understand why this was happening. I hadn’t changed anything in what I was doing — I was still working hard, arriving on time and working well with others. So it took me a while to figure it all out.


I saw that these newly promoted individuals were taking an active role in their careers by seeking out new opportunities and new ways to demonstrate their skills to a wider audience. They were taking on projects that others didn’t want and delivering results.

 

I was not doing that.


Truthfully, the thought had never even occurred to me. To reach out and ask for work that was not inherently mine wasn’t something that I intuitively pursued.


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From this realization, I started to look for these opportunities. I viewed it as a way for me to expand my knowledge and demonstrate the work I knew I could perform. Taking the time to meet with others, I focused on how I could help my surrounding colleagues and managers, and just as important, how they could help me. In this way, I connected with people that provided me with mentorship and guidance throughout my career.

 

The hard lesson that I ultimately learned was that my career was my own responsibility. I had to take an active role by seizing opportunities. It wouldn’t be in my interest to wait around and play the selection game. I couldn’t expect for things to just happen.

 

For me, this change came about when I took the initiative to take on the projects that no one else wanted — the assignments that came with no fanfare. However, these menial tasks were still key to actual delivery, albeit their success was not easy to measure. In such cases, failure was definitely an option. But while I thought that failure would mean early termination from the company, the truth was that it was only through failure that I was able to learn so much so quickly. As long as corporate policies were followed and we learned something during the process, our “failures” on a project would never be the cause of getting fired.     

 

As I’ve worked over the years, I have come to a profound discovery regarding career promotion. When you start to climb the ladder, your boss is the one that promotes you. But as you reach the middle rungs of the corporate hierarchy, it’s actually your peers that promote you. And as you get closer to the upper reaches of executive level leadership, it is the peers in your specific industry or executives outside your current path that are the ones that move you up the ladder.

 

More often than not, this happens much sooner if you get directly involved rather than simply being in the right place at the right time. 

 

Good luck with the climb and connect with me on Twitter to let me know what you’ve learned along the way.

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