Recent Blog Posts

Safeguarding the Smart City of the Future

This is the second installment of a four part series on Smart Cities with Dawn Olsen (#2 of 4).

Click here to read blog #1

Click here to read blog #3


Dawn5.jpgIn the age of smart cities, it’s an unavoidable truth that although technology can deliver new and amazing capabilities, it can also potentially be a disruptive force. That’s why security is a major focus within the development of Internet of Things.  It is important to use integrated technologies to address some of the security challenges that can emerge in connected cities.


While social media has evolved the experience of events (both big and small) by virtually connecting people, new potential threats have surfaced as a result. When the world’s eyes are on major events like,  the 2012 Olympic Games in London or the 2014 World Cups in Rio de Janeiro, protest groups may try to make the most of this global attention.


It’s not just major world events that are susceptible to such disturbances.  An unfortunate Dutch teenager found this out when their not-so-sweet 16th birthday party crashed by 3,000 people after the event announcement went viral on Facebook. This small event invitation spread wider and wider on social media, resulting in large crowds gathering and eventually police arriving to the scene in riot gear.  Cases like this are rare, but I mention it because city authorities and security services have learned lessons from it. Intel is working with authorities to safeguard against threats like these. We’re bringing together new tools, connected to the Internet of Things. From the devices in our hands and the sensors on our streets to the gateways, servers and cloud-based management platforms used to orchestrate complex security networks, innovative tech is developing on behalf of city security It’s certainly a far cry from traditional measures like simple CCTV networks. By combining inputs from different sources and various types of tech acquisitions in real time, Intel is pioneering “joined-up” security solutions. As mentioned, social media can be part of the solution as well as the challenge.  By gathering data from public networks like Twitter and FourSquare, police forces can now track situations as they unfold. And support for these measures exists: an Intel survey found that 61 percent of Americans believe it’s worthwhile for a connected city to gather anonymous information about people – that is, if the data is then used to benefit the area.


Dawn3.pngIn this way, authorities in command centers now have access to this up-to-date intelligence.  The ability to use Big Data analytics can be used to predict where trouble may occur so that preventative measures can be taken ahead of time. The technology is already showing results in pilots around the world. In one city in Europe, for example, Intel is working with local authorities to police a 400 meter strip with around 50 bars that attract20,000+ visitors each weekend. Using a system that integrates social media monitoring, light sensors, and sound-monitoring technologies, Intel is harnessing the full IoT ecosystem to help the city improve safety, reduce security and lower maintenance costs and turn a thriving event into an even more economically and viable phenomenon for the city.


As smart cities grow, security remains the number one priority for city leaders. By supplying the necessary tools and the expertise, Intel is helping these cities harness the Internet of Things to keep city dwellers safe.


This is the second installment of a four part series on Smart Cities (#2 of 4).  Click here to read blog #1.


To continue the conversation, let’s connect on Twitter @DawnOlsen


Dawn Olsen

Global Sales Director

Government Enterprise, Intel

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Cutting Congestion in Our Smart Cities

This is the third installment of a four part series on Smart Cities with Dawn Olsen (#3 of 4). 

Click here to read blog #1

Click here to read blog #2


One of the most visible results of a growing urban population is an increased congestion of traffic jams.  This affects not just our ability to go about our business, but also the quality of air that we breathe.  In my next post in this blog series, I will discuss Intel’s work to help improve air quality.  Today, I’d like to focus on smart transport.


Dawn5.jpgMore than half of the world’s population lives in cities, and the number is growing.  It’s predicted that by 2025, 37 so-called megacities around the world will have a population of more than 10 million. As the number of city dwellers continues to rise, so does the number of vehicles.  It is this reason that congestion is becoming a bigger issue in our cities that are ill-prepared for such volume growth.  For example, the journey to work can now last hours in Sao Paolo some commuters are resorting to helicopters to get around


Cities are beginning to take action to tackle this growing congestion problem.  With the ever-evolving innovations in technology, new opportunities and solutions are presented all the time. For instance, by combining existing infrastructure with smart sensors and Intel® Gateway Solutions for the Internet of Things (IoT), a city’s roadway system can be completely transformed – traffic control centers can gather useful data and get a view of how the whole transport system is working in order to improve efficiency.    


While traffic jams can cause inconveniences for everyday commuters, it can also cause critical delays for emergency response teams.  Intel is working with city partners to develop an end-to-end smart transport system that uses real-time data to calculate the fastest route for emergency services.  Through this system, vehicle-to-vehicle communications can be connected to sensors that monitor congestion levels.  With this integration, alert messages can be triggered to update a central management system. The “Intel Freeway to the Future” survey found that, if a smart transport system such as this was built, 59% of Americans would opt-in to a city program to have a sensor fitted in their car.


Planning sustainable traffic systems is an important part of the long-term initiatives Intel has developed within cities like San Jose, California. By bringing together the technological building blocks that make up the Internet of Things, Intel is helping the city improve infrastructure.  The aim in the next 40 years is to reduce the total miles travelled in the city by 40 percent while creating 25,000 new clean-tech jobs. This project has been recognized by the White House as an integral part of the Smart America initiative.  Other public-private collaborations involving smart cities and Intel – like the ongoing project in Dublin, Ireland – have also been noticed.


Dawn6.jpgThere are countless potential applications for this technology that can enhance the lives of city people.  One possibility could include an intelligent routing system for school buses so that parents can track the bus to ensure that their kids are traveling safely and on schedule.  Other opportunities exist within the idea of building a smart transport system that connects different services.  Suppose a ferry is running late, this smart transport system could alert local buses to arrive later for a smooth travelling connection.


For those of us who can’t afford helicopter rides to and from work, Intel’s smart city initiatives are driving sustainable, effective solutions to meet the challenges of rising congestion levels in the city.


This is the third installment of a four part series on Smart Cities (#3 of 4).

Click here to read blog #1

Click here to read blog #2


To continue the conversation, let’s connect on Twitter @DawnOlsen


Dawn Olsen

Global Sales Director

Government Enterprise, Intel

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President Obama calls for trade promotion authority in SOTU

Intel joins the President in the call for Congress to pass trade promotion authority (TPA) legislation. As the world’s leader in semiconductor chips and innovative technology, Intel realizes the importance of overseas trade and sales. More than three-quarters of Intel’s … Read more >

The post President Obama calls for trade promotion authority in SOTU appeared first on Policy@Intel.

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mHealth: Connecting Consumers with Care

The buzz following the mHealth Summit has been encouraging, to say the least. The December event drew 4,000 attendees, who were brought up to speed on the latest developments spanning policies and research, global health, hospital mobility, consumer engagement, privacy and security and, of course, emerging technologies.

 

The two areas of focus that I found most encouraging centered on consumer engagement and care coordination.

 

Far too often, when the industry talks about mobile health, the technology itself – or even just the promise of an emerging technology – has a way of quickly overpowering the dialogue. But as the Center for Connected Medicine’s Joseph Kvedar touched on (and several panels advanced the notion), one of the biggest issues facing healthcare right now is getting and keeping consumers interested in their own care. The success of mobile devices and apps, as well as early consumer interest in wearables, is encouraging because it shows that all the pieces are in place. But until consumers show as much interest in communicating their health information with their doctors as they do, say, sharing Facebook posts, the healthcare system overall will continue to struggle.

 

Given this present state of consumer engagement, news that care coordination works was all the more welcome.

 

As mHealthNews reported: “In health systems large and small, clinicians are using smartphones to instantly connect with others caring for the same patient. They’re sharing notes and tests, discussing treatment plans and, in many cases, bringing the patient and his/her family into the loop to map out a care plan that goes beyond the hospital or clinic. It’s a tried-and-true process that’s gone beyond the pilot stage, as was noted in Healthcare IT News’ Monday morning breakfast panel and several educational sessions. Expect this to become the norm for patient care.”

 

Taken together, the growing emphasis on consumer engagement – coupled with the now proven advantages of care coordination to help overcome the disconnect between physicians and other care givers – is, in my opinion, highly likely to yield meaningful outcomes.

 

Equally important, as medical groups and health systems begin to make headway with consumer engagement while addressing care coordination holistically, providers should be able to work together to keep patients healthier – while remaining competitive in the marketplace.

 

What questions about mHealth do you have?

 

As a B2B journalist, John Farrell has covered healthcare IT since 1997 and is a sponsored correspondent for Intel Health & Life Sciences.

Read John’s other blog posts

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The Next Retail Transformation: Mobility and the Internet of Things

Internet of Things technology implementations in the retail environment may be one of the most exciting and personally resonant for many people. In his intriguing guest blog post below, Cory McElroy, Director, Product Management and Marketing, Retail Solutions Global Business … Read more >

The post The Next Retail Transformation: Mobility and the Internet of Things appeared first on IoT@Intel.

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Creating a Cloud Perspective: Re-envisioning your Revolutionary Data Center

This is the second installment of a five part series on Tech & Finance.  Click here to read blog #1.

 

Blalock 1.jpgAs I explained in my previous blog post, we are in the midst of a Third Industrial Revolution, which is driving huge changes in the way we live and work.


Enabled by the technological rise of computing, communications and the Internet, this latest disruptive period presents a range of challenges and opportunities for financial service organizations. Today, we’re going to delve into one of them: The Cloud.


Just as the rest of the world is riding a third wave of innovation, so is the data center.  First, we had an era of servers dedicated to a particular workload or a specific department.  This gave way to virtualized servers – which allowed infrastructures to be shared and hardware or software to be decoupled.  Subsequently, this pushed us into what we presently see today - a major focus on rapid, agile and efficient service delivery through the cloud.


The impact of this revolution can clearly be felt outside the server room. Business leaders now want their information and services to be delivered as quickly as possible. Getting results in a timespan of months is no longer an option; it’s got to be done in minutes. Unfortunately this is easier said than done. For example, I attended the SIBOS 2014 conference in Boston in September, where I learned that it’s estimated that about 85% of a bank’s resources are focused on running the bank, while only 15% is used on changing and innovating the bank. Wouldn’t it be nice if that ratio was the other way around?


If you want to achieve that re-balancing act, you need to look at minimizing time, cost and labor.  Simultaneously, agility, automation and elasticity needs to increase across the business. Cloud can help with this – whether it’s in public, private or hybrid form – it can truly accelerate your digital transformation by shifting investments to where it’s needed most.


Blalock2.jpgIn the digital service economy, a key limiter for many financial institutions is their data center infrastructure. Years of having each business unit or product team manage its own sales, marketing, even P&L, can often result in highly fragmented IT environments and data repositories, not to mention duplicated effort for employees and a confusing experience for the customer. But cloud can enable digital transformation by removing legacy architecture and IT silos within the bank, in turn boosting operational efficiency, customer engagement, compliance and risk management.


I’m excited by the work that Intel is doing to meet the challenges of our customers in the financial service industry. Our strategy of re-envisioning the data center revolves around Software Defined Infrastructure (SDI). Essentially this means that users have control over a pool (or pools) of resources that may include server, network, and storage – all managed by orchestration software that uses whichever hardware is available. This approach is simplified, elastic, and built on open industry standards. We believe it will have a highly disruptive effect on the way enterprises think about defining, building, running and managing data centers.


The cloud is just one element of a successful revolutionary enterprise though. In my next post, I’ll be looking at how financial services should use analytics to pull deeper insights from their data resources.


This is the second installment of a five part series on Tech & Finance.  Click here to read blog #1.


Let’s continue the conversation on Twitter: @blalockm


Mike Blalock

Global Sales Director

Financial Services Industry, Intel

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