Intel Events: AISES Conference focuses on Native Culture in a Corporate World

“There are 86,400 seconds in every day and every second provides us with a choice on how we can best use that time”, so said the highly accomplished Dr. Mae Jemison in her keynote address to kick off the 32nd annual AISES conference . This year’s AISES ( American Indian Science and Engineering Society) conference theme was POWER UP, and more than 1800 students, educators and professionals gathered in Albuquerque, New Mexico this past week to demonstrate their powerful culture, collaboration and commitment to community.

A Gem to Behold

As a Gemstone sponsor, Intel is committed to fulfilling AISES ’ missionto encourage Native Americans to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). In addition to financial support, Intel also serves on the Corporate Advisory Council, which helps shape the future of AISES and provides $50,000 in scholarships to AISES students. During the AISES conference, at a team dinner, a young man approached our table to thank Intel for his scholarship. The heartfelt expression of gratitude and excitement by Thomas was incredibly touching and put a face to one of the students that we are able to help with this scholarship.

Intel Recruiters Capture Top Talent at the Career Fair

For six hours, a team of dedicated Intel employees, led by our trusted Conference Recruiting Manager, Cheris, greeted candidates, screened resumes, and shared with hundreds of attendees why Intel is a great place to work. One of the coolest memories from this day was watching Cheris provide resume tips to a young lady, who immediately went and updated her resume so she could provide it to one of our hiring managers in Corporate Services. I was quite impressed with her initiative and am quite certain she will make a great Intel employee in the near future! Our impressive recruiters and brilliant booth drew a steady crowd all day, and the raffle at the end packed the aisle with hopeful winners.

Small Group, BIG Results!

But we weren’t just there to recruit. With less than 100 members in six chapters, our employee group, the Intel Native American Network (INAN), has accomplished a lot this past year and played a key role in ensuring. Employees from our this year’s AISES conference was a huge success. Two of our employees from Rio Rancho, Thomas and Shaun, each logged more than 100 volunteer hours into the planning of the conference! Thanks to their dedication, conference attendees were provided with evening entertainment every night-traditional dance and drum ceremonies, live music, and the incredible closing Pow Wow. They also hosted an Intel only dinner and a cross-site INAN meeting, where each chapter shared their 2010 highlights and goals for 2011. I was impressed to learn that INAN was the driving force behind Intel’s floating holiday that we all now enjoy, and I was amazed to hear how involved they are in their local schools and native communities.

A Change to Give Back

I spoke with all the Intel attendees throughout the conference and asked the same question of each: why is it important for you to support AISES? Without fail, every one of them responded in similar fashion: they were given an opportunity by AISES through scholarships, leadership development and career guidance and now it’s their turn to give back. Christopher , a facility engineer who was hired 7 years ago at an AISES career Fair, says “the opportunity to re-connect with an organization that helped shape my career and provide that same level of support to aspiring native American engineering students is rewarding”. Lindsey, a materials engineer was hired last year at the AISES conference and believes that attending the conference demonstrates Intel’s commitment to diversity and STEM support for Native Americans.

Every Second Counts

As the AISES conference came to a close with a traditional and inspirational Pow Wow, I had time to reflect on the numerous lessons learned during this jam packed three- day event. There were so many inspirational people who shared their insight and wisdom, but Dr. Jemison’s opening remarks echoed in my ear as I listened to the closing remarks of Rear Admiral Craig Faller of the United States Navy.

I may not be able to control time, but I can control how I choose to spend my time, and I intend to put those 86,400 seconds a day to good use following his advice, to “work hard, be passionate, stay committed and demonstrate integrity in all I do.”

 

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