Right place, right time — My Journey to Intel

Looking down my memory lane, so many memories from my childhood flash across my mind. My favorite memory is of my siblings and me sitting on our rooftop on a rainy day, plucking mangoes from our neighbor’s tree. The rain complemented the whole mango eating experience since it was an automatic wash for the mess we created while peeling mangoes with our teeth; the combination of a tropical rain and mango, on the other hand, was an unforgettable sensation! We were definitely lucky to escape lightning bolts, this was one of the many crazy adventures my siblings and I were fortunate to come out of unharmed.

Now, looking back, it seems like it was the same fortune that gave me a chance to become part of the Intel family, 33,000 miles away from home, pursuing my professional goals in the role of a Rotation Engineer (RE). Being the youngest daughter of a modest Dominican family, I sometimes wonder if it was sheer luck that I am where I am. The answer, in my mind, is a resounding NO since, in my opinion; luck is when things happen when you didn’t play any role to make it happen. It was FORTUNE, I built my own fortune. I was ready when the opportunity came my way.

In my family, no one left home until they got married, this is a custom in my country. So when I told my parents that I wanted to leave the Dominican Republic—and my comfort zone—to pursue a higher education in the USA, they were shocked! They had questions like, “Where did this come from?” and “Why the sudden desire to break free from the family pattern?” My sisters went to college, got good jobs, got married and were happy. My roles models were doing well. However, I could never see myself in their shoes and feel content. I always felt that it wasn’t the path for me. I used to wonder what could have triggered this out-of-box thinking: Was I different from my siblings? Was I raised differently? The answer lay somewhere in the lines of knowledge, exposure and technology. It was technology that had allowed me to see things my siblings didn’t see. It opened my eyes and made me realize that there was a world full of opportunities and experiences beyond what we saw or perceived. It motivated me to dream high and take risks. It inspired me to step out of my box and enter a world full of challenges, competition and knowledge. Above all, it gave me an opportunity to explore and express myself.

Coming to Intel is part of that journey and I’d like to share those experiences in future blogs. My role as an RE is more or less an extension of what drove me to move so far; I like to think outside of the box and venture beyond my comfort zone. Now, as I look back, I see my hard work paying off. Every four months is a new beginning to learn, share, empower and be inspired. The Rotational Engineer Program (REP) is allowing me to see so much of Intel in just one year (if you are interested in applying to the REP, visit the REP page and make sure you meet all the requirements). It has given me endless opportunities and I’ve been embracing them as they come along. I had goals before entering the program, but now, those goals have magnified significantly. Similar to the sensation of eating mangoes in tropical rain, the feeling of being in the right place at the right time and having a chance to cherish an experience that only some fortunate souls are blessed with, gives me strength and courage to move forward. I am indeed in the right place.

Find your opportunity

4 Responses to Right place, right time — My Journey to Intel

  1. Naikur says:

    “luck is when things happen when you didn’t play any role to make it happen. It was FORTUNE, I built my own fortune. I was ready when the opportunity came my way” – perfectly said.

  2. Naikur says:

    “luck is when things happen when you didn’t play any role to make it happen. It was FORTUNE, I built my own fortune. I was ready when the opportunity came my way” – inspiring!!!

  3. Ana Rosario says:

    Hi Naikur! I think it’s one of those things that we all know and then forget about it. Sometimes it can be hard to put it into words.