Secure Automated Vehicles Fuse Security With Functional Safety

I’m excited about the opportunity we have before us to lay the groundwork for safer automated vehicles, as outlined recently in U.S. President Barack Obama’s piece for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “Self-driving, yes, but also safe.”  I see a clear path for fully autonomous vehicles to operate safely for the protection of everyone in and around the vehicle. Of course, no one company can do this alone. A job of this magnitude takes an entire ecosystem.

In the collaborations forming around architecting automated vehicles, automakers are realizing that they must ensure functional safety at all levels — hardware, software and network — from car to cloud. That’s why I am pleased that the Intel IoT ecosystem is working within the automotive industry to shift thinking about what we do today in order to enable the autonomous future of tomorrow.

 

Functional Safety, Meet Security

An infographic showing automated driving.

We see the future as one in which the automotive industry fuses functional safety with cybersecurity. The two are interrelated and mutually dependent. Current ISO 26262 guidelines for functional safety do not fully comprehend this interrelationship. SAE J3061 has emerged as a great start to the guidelines for automotive cybersecurity, however the industry will need to establish some framework for implementation, or a reference architecture and set of best-known methods that demonstrate this fusion of safety and cybersecurity.

When I speak with automotive industry leaders around the world, I am often surprised by the widely varying perspectives on these two topics. Some believe that functional safety considerations beyond the in-vehicle architectures are not necessary. However, in a world moving quickly to predominately connected vs. not connected vehicles, the effects of security and functional safety concepts in the automotive network infrastructure and data centers from an end-to-end consideration are paramount. Security vulnerabilities will open the doors to safety concerns. What is really needed is a secure end-to-end scalable architecture.

 

Scaling out Automated Vehicle Safety

An image of vehicles of a freeway representing vehicle-to-vehicle communciation.

We need partners and industry standards to scale. The Intel IoT ecosystem understands the complexity of fusing functional safety with security. From researching and developing business models with OEMs to collaborating with regulatory bodies, members of the Intel IoT ecosystem are helping guide functional safety for automated vehicles. Add to this the cybersecurity and data center expertise of Intel and you have a solid foundation for a secure end-to-end solution.

As with any nascent technology, the need for automakers to differentiate their offerings, combined with the newness of the automated driving market, is making standardization a back-burner priority. Here at Intel, we believe collaboration is the logical answer. That is why Intel remains a leader, supporter and contributor to key industry consortiums and relevant standards bodies, and we have actively contributed on both ISO 26262 and SAE J3061.

 

The Road to Autonomous

A family pushing a stroller walks across the street in front of an automated vehicle.

Fueled by decades of success, the Intel IoT ecosystem is paving the road ahead for the automated vehicles of the future. That is what happens when innovation and collaboration merge on the road to fully automated vehicles. Intel is a logical trusted advisor to the auto industry for safety and security — together we can make a better future.

To learn more about the road ahead for fully automated vehicles, visit intel.com/automotive. For more on Intel IoT developments, subscribe to our RSS feed for email notifications of blog updates, or visit intel.com/IoTLinkedInFacebook and Twitter.

 

Craig Hurst

About Craig Hurst

Craig Hurst is the Director of Strategic Planning and Product Management within Intel’s Transportation Solutions Division. He is responsible for transportation HW and SW roadmaps, ecosystem strategies, GTM plans and overall platform success across the connected transportation and logistics, software defined cockpit, and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and Autonomous Driving segments. Craig’s team is responsible for both the long term vision and strategy that maximize market value for safer and smarter driving as well as the near term product management and delivery of products that thrill and excite customers. Craig has held various director roles for strategy, marketing, and product management at Intel in divisions ranging from SW developer products, healthcare devices, and networking. His passion is to inspire innovation for new products, segments, and business models. In his ~20 years at Intel, Craig has helped deliver dozens of new products to market, many winning industry awards (including Intel’s first direct to consumer retail product, the world’s first UPnP certified residential gateway, Intel’s first FDA approved product, and Intel® RealSense™ Technology). When not at work, Craig enjoys fishing, waterskiing, travel, and perfecting a new BBQ or kitchen recipe. Craig holds a BSEE from Seattle University, and Certificate of Business Excellence from U.C. Berkeley.

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