Life in the Fast Lane: Intel Automotive Security Workshop Participants Race Toward Connected Driving Safety

ASBR workshopBuckle up: the Automotive Security Review Board (ASRB) is soaring down the fast lane toward collaborations that are already providing researchers with new opportunities to improve automotive security products and connected car technology.

In an effort to increase automotive exploration among researchers, the Intel Internet of Things Group recently hosted a pair of automotive security research workshops, the first of which took place January 12-14 in San Diego, and the second February 2-4 in Barcelona. Individuals from around the globe were invited and given the opportunity to work hands-on with an Intel IoT and Linux-based in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) simulation platform, with the goals of advancing knowledge of threat areas, identifying vulnerabilities and potential mitigation strategies, and identifying topics for future research.

Engineering staff from Intel’s Transportation Solutions Division and Wind River were on hand to answer questions, guide research activity, and observe the excellent and eye-opening work produced by the highly qualified and experienced participants.

ASBR workshop planning

The research teams—comprised of security consultants and researchers, senior software and hardware engineers, cryptographers, and post-doctoral, doctoral, and undergraduate students—probed and prodded the Intel IoT in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) simulation platform from myriad angles, using everything from every day to exotic hardware and software techniques, in an effort to reveal potential threat areas and recommend security design improvements.

Both workshops proved to be highly instructive and enjoyable for everyone involved, and will contribute directly to advancing Intel IoT’s ultimate goal of making intelligent transportation more secure and safe. The teams competed for points, and a number of modest prizes were awarded, but in the end, what seemed to matter most to everyone involved was the spirit of fun and open collaboration that emerged as they confronted the challenges presented by the simulation environment.

In parallel to conducting these workshops on our own simulation platform, Intel is assisting the industry by founding Automotive Security Review Board. As the board is formed and research plans emerge, we can look forward to much more and varied automotive research geared toward the automotive industry’s interest in making the next generation of transportation — such as collaborative Intel IoT connected driving projects — even more secure. To stay updated and follow Intel ASRB’s progress on automotive security, visit ASRB.org .

Thank you to all of the participants at our San Diego and Barcelona workshops!

ASBR particpants

San Diego Participants

Cameron Beyer, Ford

Chad Dewey, Saginaw Valley State University

Steven Drewes, SpaceX / RIIS

Shane Fry, Star Lab

Helena Handschuh, Rambus

Hunter James, RIIS

Jonathan Kline, Star Lab

Karl Koscher, UCSD

Joseph Maes, SVSU

Martins Mozeiko, LG

Harsh Patil, LG

Chris Poulin, IBM

Guangzhi Qu, Oakland University

Michael Roof, SVSU

Spenser Solys, RIIS

Armin Wasicek, UC Berkeley

Rob Wood, NCC Group

 

Barcelona Participants

Néstor Álvarez Díaz, University of Laguna

Senad Aruc, UL

Daniele Bonomi, Security Researcher

Davide Cioccia, UL

David  Clare, NCC Group

Radek Domanski, Security Researcher

Jako Fritz, UL

Florian Gaultier, SCRT

Jos Heijmans, UL

Ryan Hileman, Security Researcher

Neil Jones, NCC Group

Sebastian Koszyk, Secure Net World

Denis Legezo, Kaspersky

Francisco Martín Fernández, University of Laguna

Daniel Mayer, NCC Group

Jan Nordholz, Technical Univerity Berlin

Nicolas Oberli, Security Researcher

Alexandra Rivero García, University of Laguna

Iván Santos González, University of Laguna

Jean-Pierre Seifert, Professor at Technical University Berlin

Adrien Stoffel, SCRT

Paul Wooderson, Horiba-Mira

ASBR workshop participants

To learn more about what Intel’s work on connected cars, intelligent transportation, automotive exploration, vehicle connectivity, and more, visit intel.com/automotive or visit Intel’s Automotive Security Review Board page. To learn more about Intel IoT developments, subscribe to our RSS feed for email notifications of blog updates, or visit intel.com/IoTLinkedInFacebook, and Twitter.

Matt Haugh

About Matt Haugh

Matt Haugh is a marketing strategist who has worked in technology for nearly 20 years. Prior to joining Intel in 2012, he worked at the Palo Alto Research Center, and has also worked for Microsoft, Adobe Systems, Xerox Corporation, and several startups. Matt has a keen interest in the Internet of Things and the connected world.

One Response to Life in the Fast Lane: Intel Automotive Security Workshop Participants Race Toward Connected Driving Safety

  1. Chad Dewey says:

    I was proud to be a part of this workshop – what a great group of people and a wonderful experience! I’m looking forward to seeing what exciting things Intel will be planning regarding the ASRB in the future.