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Enterprise and Data Center Transformation at Oracle Open World 2013 with Intel’s Douglas Fisher

It’s that time of year again for Oracle OpenWorld (OOW) and through our close collaboration with Oracle, Intel’s Douglas W. Fisher, corporate vice president and general manager of the Software and Services Group, will be keynoting and discussing the new virtuous cycle: evolving IT around software and services.

 

Be sure to catch his keynote Monday morning, September 23 at 9:00 a.m., where he will talk about the major transformations in recent years from supporting business and serving the employee base to delivering value-added services to customers. Doug will also talk about the explosion of connected mobile devices and the Internet of ‘Things’ (IoT) and how it is generating massive amounts of varied data.

 

The underlying architecture that powers this cycle is built upon Intel® Xeon® processor-based Software Defined Infrastructure, Big Data analytics, APIs and cross platform technologies. Come learn from guests implementing these architectures and hear Fisher describe Intel’s strategy of providing technology building blocks and partnership with Oracle.

 

Not only will Doug be talking about the new virtuous cycle, but Intel will host a cluster of high-profile sessions where users can get detailed and technical info on:

 

 

OOW is a great chance to discover new product and technology solutions, improve technical proficiency and knowledge, learn tips and tricks for currently installed products, and understand where the industry is headed.

 

Please follow Tim with the growing #BigData community @TimIntel.

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Enabling Business Mobility Through IT Innovation

Managing the Changing IT Landscape: Business Mobility

 

I’m here at the Intel Developer Forum 2013, where Intel is unveiling a wealth of new technology. CEO Brian Krzanich and President Renée James kicked off the conference yesterday by focusing on the era of mobility. And while mobility isn’t new, the level of integration users expect from IT is.

 

We all know what makes a good mobile experience, from ease of use and instant availability to responsive applications, personalized services, and context-aware computing. What we often forget is what it takes to deliver that experience.

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Mobility implies a service-oriented world that starts in the data center and ends with the device we are using. New technologies are not only the foundation for an improved mobile experience, but they’re the strategic tools needed for business transformation. All of this has become clear to me as I listen to the industry buzz here at IDF.

 

And while the opportunities have never been greater, the implications for IT are staggering. To help organizations manage this change, Intel has launched a suite of diverse technologies designed for business mobility.

 

Foundation for a High-Performing, Agile, and Efficient Data Center

 

Just like there’s no one-size-fits-all business model, there’s no single architecture for data centers, either. The data center of today requires the support of a diverse set of workloads that make workers more mobile and businesses more responsive to rapidly changing conditions. That makes versatility and performance the name of the game.

 

Cloud is the back end for most mobile services today, and inside every cloud is data center infrastructure that serves up applications and data to meet every device user’s demand for ubiquitous access and speed. Higher performing infrastructure means faster, more efficient business services.

 

Intel Xeon processors are found in the data centers of the leading cloud service providers and the largest private enterprise clouds. They also power some of the world’s largest supercomputers, including the number-one fastest supercomputer, “Milky Way 2”.

 

Yesterday, Intel released the Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v2 product family, offering IT another 50 percent in server performance and 45 percent in energy efficiency. These processors also accelerate storage and networking performance for a balanced infrastructure solution. With hundreds of OEM infrastructure designs, the Intel Xeon E5 processor family is ready to support the next generation of cloud and advanced analytics solutions.

 

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click for video

 

New Solutions for Lightweight, Repetitive Workloads

 

Yet there are still specialized tasks in the data center that can be run most effectively by new form factors such as the microserver. The recently announced Intel Atom processor C2000 product family is an excellent choice for a high-density, energy-efficient microserver to handle scale-out workloads with repetitive tasks such as basic dedicated hosting, low-end static web serving, and simple content delivery—all key to a superior mobile experience. These processors are purpose-built to support extreme density with generational leaps of up to seven times greater performance and six times greater energy efficiency. With x86 compatibility, this hardworking microserver integrates smoothly into your data center architecture.

Bridging the Gap between Users and IT

 

Let’s shift to mobile devices, where employees want freedom and IT wants control. Today’s mobile technology solutions must deliver the security and manageability to protect sensitive corporate data, yet allow employees to access the information they need for faster decision making and better collaboration. It’s no small task.

 

Enhancements in the 4th generation Intel Core vPro processor are designed to deliver even stronger security and advanced performance for mobile productivity. Low-power, high-performance processors let users get to work quickly, with a lightweight design and long battery life.

 

Users can now work easily with a more secure “passwordless” VPN experience and collaborate with wireless display capability. All of this with added security at the hardware level to address threats, access, data protection, and monitoring and remediation.

 

These high-performance processors have enabled tremendous innovation across OEM solutions, giving IT and users more choice in sleek, robust form factors. New business 2 in 1 devices are a great alternative for users who typically carry more than one device, and they reduce the number of devices for IT to support.

 

Business-Ready Tablets Offer a New Way to Work

 

Tablet use cases are continuing to emerge in the enterprise because of mobility. A new generation of Intel Atom processor-based tablets for business was introduced this week, complete with enterprise-grade security, seamless IT compatibility, and the performance to keep up with users. The capabilities I’m most excited about include multitasking with multiple screens open, viewing Flash* pages, and connecting to peripherals with convenient USB ports.

 

Soon to be available in a range of thin and light designs with longer battery life, these tablets offer compatibility with the Windows operating system environment so that users can access existing apps and get more from new touch-enabled apps.

 

New Technology is Just the Beginning

 

This hardware lays the foundation for next-generation IT solutions. Harnessing these capabilities for business requires ongoing IT innovation and new software solutions. Software-defined networks (SDN) and mobile application development are quickly emerging as key imperatives for the enterprise.

 

I invite you to share your insights in the Intel Peer Network, a community of IT and business professionals with a common goal: to realize greater business value for our organizations through technology innovation.

 

Chris
@chris_p_intel
#lookinside #ITCenter #IDF13

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Big Data, Evolving Architectures Set Stage for Software-Defined Storage

Data centers managers are increasingly virtualizing servers and now networks to better utilize data center assets.  At the same time, they are adapting to the flood of information coming from Big Data, social media, Internet-of-Things and other trends. 

 

Data center storage has been challenged by these trends. Virtualized servers and networks mean a storage system is processing many more requests and is becoming a bottleneck for the entire system. 

 

Big Data, on the other hand, is flooding storage systems with more unstructured data than ever before.  IDC predicts that there will be 40 Zettabytes of data (or 5200 GB per person) stored in the next seven years!  How does a data center manager keep up with these demands without blowing the IT budget?

 

Storage systems are evolving to respond to these challenges.  First, today’s storage requires more intelligence.  Rather than simply saving all of the growing data to disk, applying optimization technologies can help to better manage storage resources and reduce the capacity required.

 

These optimization technologies include:


  • On the fly de-duplication, which uses intelligent pattern matching to reduce up to 95% of the data before it is saved to disk. (Source: IBM storage simulcast, November 9, 2011)
  • Real-time compression algorithms that exploit statistical redundancy to represent data without losing information
  • Intelligent tiering, which can dynamically allocate data across cache, SSDs and HDDs based on frequency of access and other policies
  • Thin provisioning, which allocates available storage in real time across virtual and real capacity.

 

Secondly, the architecture of storage systems is evolving from dedicated standalone appliances to distributed systems.  In fact, many of the newer storage solutions are software solutions that run on any standard Intel-based server.  This transformation of the storage system architecture, combined with ability to dynamically scale capacity and performance, has led to the term Software-Defined Storage (SDS). 

 

Everyone has a slightly different definition of SDS, but the main elements are de-coupling of storage software from hardware, automation of storage management tasks – autonomous provisioning, placement/tiering and scaling, and the third piece is the pooling of heterogeneous resources.. 

 

At the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco this week, Software-Defined Infrastructure (SDI) is a big topic.  In fact, SDI was part of the IDF press briefing of Senior Vice President Diane Bryant, who is the general manager of the Datacenter and Connected Systems Group, and mentioned in the keynote address of Intel CEO Brian Krzanich. The promise is a data center that dynamically adapts to workload needs.

 

Software-Defined Storage, along with Software-Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV), is a key element of that.  It’s a new way to think about infrastructure in the face of the challenges confronting today’s data centers.

 

All through IDF, Intel and our partners will be demonstrating SDS solutions and the Intel technologies involved, which include the Intel® Xeon® processor E5, Intel® Solid-State Drives Data Center Family and 10 Gigabit Intel® Ethernet Converged Network Adapters.  These SDS partners include EMC’s ViPR, Inktank, Nexenta, Red Hat Storage, Scality and VMware’s Virtual SAN.  Come by the SDI Community in the Technology Showcase and see the solutions being demonstrated.

 

SDS is ushering in an exciting new world of storage that will help remove bottlenecks, improve capacity utilization, reduce CapEx and OpEx costs, and keep performance in line with other elements of the software-defined infrastructure, while offering new flexibility to keep up with the data tsunami that firms are experiencing today.

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#IDF13 Day One Started With Big Announcements From Intel

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Intel CEO, Brian Krzanich, got things off to a bang today at IDF13 in San Francisco stating that Intel has the right technology and products to power everything from tiny wearable devices to enormous supercomputers. ‘Our strategy is very simple,’ Krzanich said. ‘Our plan is to lead in every segment of computing- servers, PCs, tablets, phones and beyond.’

 

While some of the products Intel announced were expected, there were a couple surprises. These included a smartphone powered by a 22nm ‘Silvermont’ Atom chip the and first working laptop running on a 14nm ‘Broadwell’ Core processor. Intel also announced a new Quark processor family, which is even smaller and uses less power than Atom, designed for wearable devices and ‘The Internet of Things.’

 

Krzanich didn’t provide any info on Bay Trail, details of which should be announced tomorrow, he said that Intel’s chips were already showing up in tablets, demonstrating a Lenovo tablet to prove the point. He said the ability for Intel’s customer to choose between Atom and Core, and between Windows 8 and Android would give the company an edge in tablets. ‘It’s not just one tablet,’ he said adding that numerous tablets would be available at prices starting at under $100 this holiday season.

 

Renee James later took center stage stating that ‘our chips are built on atoms’ and reminded attendees of Intel’s 45 years of leadership and innovation. James believes that Intel will help society transform to what she calls ‘integrated computing,’ where users move away from worrying about the form factor of computing toward using technology to save lives and solve big problems. James gave a quick review of some Intel history, reminding attendees that ‘Moore’s Law’ remains alive and well. James showcased wearable devices powered by Intel that have benefited the healthcare industry and suggested that Intel has explored the possibility of ‘ingestable’ technologies.

 

Tuesday was an explosion of new products and new direction from Intel, tomorrow promises to pack even more fireworks, don’t miss the show. Follow all the action at @IntelITS and use #IDF13 to join in the conversation.

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#IDF13 Opens With Small is Big Message

If there was one theme that came though big at #IDF13 in the Brian Krazanich (BK) and Renee James keynote this morning was that size matters. The smaller the device the more personal and scalable the use case bigger the data challenge and the bigger the opportunity to change the world.

 

BK opened with the dramatic innovation that is happening at Intel emphasizing the importance of SOC (System on a Chip) integration – demonstrating how Moore’s Law is enabling this future reduction in size of chips.  After showcasing the latest latest 22nm and 14nm products powering everything from powerful data center infrastructure to 60 new 2 in 1 personal computing devices to Atom based phones to a new architecture called Quark, that is 1/5th  the size and 1/10th the power of Atom to enable the Internet of Things.

 

The message was about the power and opportunity for integration: from technology integration to delivering integrated computing experiences.  As Intel moves to an SOC focused approach to innovation core CPU real estate on today’s chips are taking up less and less of the overall silicon footprint as new capabilities are integrated. This integration is enabling the delivery of advanced system capability to smaller devices that are located virtually everywhere.

 

 

Renee showed how we can take full advantage of this approach describing an integrated computing solution exhibited in healthcare for wearable technology where a current bedside health monitoring system is being replaced by a wristband and in the future implanted technology on a patient so that we can move patient care out of the hospital, reducing the cost and improving quality of care.

 

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Renee also discussed the ability to make automobile headlights smart for safer driving, building smart cities and capturing enough information to cost efficiently human genome sequences to address cancer treatment more effectively.

 

It was a motivational kickoff to what has already been an exciting conference. Follow coverage live on twitter with #IDF13.

 

Tomorrow I will recap some of the insights I’m gaining for mobility and business.

 

Chris

@chris_p_intel

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#IDF13 Opens With Small is Big Message

If there was one theme that came though big at #IDF13 in the Brian Krazanich (BK) and Renee James keynote this morning was that size matters. The smaller the device the more personal and scalable the use case bigger the data challenge and the bigger the opportunity to change the world.

 

BK opened with the dramatic innovation that is happening at Intel emphasizing the importance of SOC (System on a Chip) integration – demonstrating how Moore’s Law is enabling this future reduction in size of chips.  After showcasing the latest latest 22nm and 14nm products powering everything from powerful data center infrastructure to 60 new 2 in 1 personal computing devices to Atom based phones to a new architecture called Quark, that is 1/5th  the size and 1/10th the power of Atom to enable the Internet of Things.

 

The message was about the power and opportunity for integration: from technology integration to delivering integrated computing experiences.  As Intel moves to an SOC focused approach to innovation core CPU real estate on today’s chips are taking up less and less of the overall silicon footprint as new capabilities are integrated. This integration is enabling the delivery of advanced system capability to smaller devices that are located virtually everywhere.

 

 

Renee showed how we can take full advantage of this approach describing an integrated computing solution exhibited in healthcare for wearable technology where a current bedside health monitoring system is being replaced by a wristband and in the future implanted technology on a patient so that we can move patient care out of the hospital, reducing the cost and improving quality of care.

 

intel wearable technology healthcare.jpg

Renee also discussed the ability to make automobile headlights smart for safer driving, building smart cities and capturing enough information to cost efficiently human genome sequences to address cancer treatment more effectively.

 

It was a motivational kickoff to what has already been an exciting conference. Follow coverage live on twitter with #IDF13.

 

Tomorrow I will recap some of the insights I’m gaining for mobility and business.

 

Chris

@chris_p_intel

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Getting the Most Out of Modern Software & Hardware

The Intel/Red Hat relationship spans more than 10 years and is a great example of how these two companies are helping transform the industry. Intel and Red Hat’s engineering collaboration relationship has positioned them as leaders in the open source software ecosystem.

 

Jim Totton, Vice President and General Manager of the Platform Business Unit at Red Hat Inc., talks about our collaboration over the years in this video, where he discusses how the combination of Intel servers and Red Hat enterprise Linux software is enabling the next generation of agile data centers—physical, virtual and cloud. 

 

The Intel® Xeon® Processor E5 2600 v2 Product Family is the next important innovation solution Intel is bringing to the market; with improved memory architecture, caching advancements, increased memory bandwidth and lower power consumption. What makes the Intel Xeon Processor E5 2600 v2 Family so compelling is that the processor can automatically move into lower power states, depending on workload requirements, enabling an agile data center with optimized performance and improved energy efficiency.

 

Jim talks about those benefits, and illustrates how Red Hat’s enterprise operating system takes advantage of the hardware innovations found in Intel® Xeon® processors, which ultimately translates into value for organizations and their data center managers.

 

Check out Jim’s video! And visit http://intel.ly/11A5aF2 to learn about the latest technology advancements in Intel® architecture and Intel® technologies.

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Transforming the Infrastructure: Why I’m Excited for IDF

If you’ve ever attended an Intel Developer Forum (IDF), you know they’re a great opportunity to learn about some of the new technologies and products Intel is developing – from Ultrabooks™ and mobile processors to solid-state drives and next-generation server and networking technologies. Intel’s vision for our connected digital world is always on full display at IDF and our executive keynotes, technology expert sessions, and demos offer a glimpse at how we’ll help you get there. Needless to say, there’s always a lot of excitement surrounding each IDF, and the Fall 2013 edition will be no different.

 

As vice president and general manager of the Communications and Storage Infrastructure Group (CSIG), I’m particularly excited about the role Intel’s vision of a Software-Defined Infrastructure (SDI) will play at IDF and how our vision will change the industry.

 

There’s already been a great deal of discussion around software-defined networking (SDN) this year and for good reason. Centralizing the control plane across networking devices is an exciting new industry trend and like always, Intel wants to provide technology leadership. SDN, in turn, can help IT create a network that’s more agile, more cost-effective, and is able to more quickly deliver revenue-generating services to users and customers.

 

This discussion has been largely limited to data center and enterprise, but we believe those use cases are just the tip of the iceberg. Technologies like network function virtualization (NFV), the Intel® Data Plane Development Kit (Intel® DPDK), and software-defined storage (SDS) will allow us to expand this story to include even greater data center centralization as well as new use cases, including cloud and telco infrastructures and devices at the edge of the access network. In short, it’s not just the network, but the entire infrastructure.

 

The technologies I mentioned above are key ingredients in Intel’s SDI vision, and we’ll be talking about them a great deal at IDF this week. Here are just a few of the highlights you can expect:

 

  • How the combination of Intel hardware and software, including the Intel® Data Plane Development Kit (Intel® DPDK) Accelerated Open vSwitch, enables greater NFV performance for data center and telco networks.
  • How Intel is extending SDN switching into microserver designs with a network solution that delivers the industry’s first 2.5GbE, high-density, low latency, SDN-enabled Ethernet switch solutions specifically developed for microservers.
  • Switch vendors discussing products based on the Intel® Open Network Platform Switch Reference Design, which deliver cost-effective SDN-capable systems to their customers.
  • How Intel QuickAssist Technology helps reduce Hadoop-sort performance by up to 40% while reducing CPU utilization[1].
  • Improvements delivered by the Intel® Intelligent Storage Acceleration Library (Intel® ISA-L) across a range of storage applications.
  • How Intel is optimizing products for next-generation network virtualization technologies, including VXLAN and NVGRE.

 

We’ll also be showcasing the SDI ecosystem, with more than 25 of our partners demonstrating SDI solutions in the Data Center and SDI community. You’ll see products based on Intel reference designs, management and control software optimized for those designs, products designed for service providers, and solutions that enable new types of storage deployments.

 

For those of you who won’t be joining us in San Francisco this week, our communications, networking, and storage experts will be blogging about key SDI technologies and providing links to some of the content we’ve created to help you understand them. You’ll also be able to read blog posts from some of our partners, who will be discussing how their products complement Intel’s SDI vision.

 

This is an exciting and transformative period in networking and storage. With more devices accessing the Internet every day, data center infrastructures – whether Enterprise, Cloud or Telco service providers – need to be ready to accommodate growth and to easily provide the services needed by all of these new devices. SDI will make it easier for us to get there, and the technologies we’re developing today will change how infrastructures is deployed and managed for years to come. We are very excited to discuss these technologies with you this week.

 


[1] Software and workloads used in performance tests may have been optimized for performance only on Intel microprocessors. Performance tests, such as SYSmark* and MobileMark*, are measured using specific computer systems, components, software, operations and functions. Any change to any of those factors may cause the results to vary. You should consult other information and performance tests to assist you in fully evaluating your contemplated purchases, including the performance of that product when combined with other products.

The Apache Hadoop* cluster consisted of a master server and four slave servers over a 10 gigabit Ethernet network. The master server was configured with dual Intel® Xeon® X5570 processors and 64GB of RAM. The slave nodes each consisted of dual Intel® Xeon® E5-2680 processors; 128GB RAM, two dual-core Intel® QuickAssist Technology cards with hardware version C1 SKU4, firmware version 1.0.0, and driver version 1.2.0; seven 300GB solid state drives in a RAID 0 configuration; and an external SAS enclosure with 24 64GB solid state drives in a RAID 0 configuration. Each server was running CentOS Release 6.3 with Linux kernel 2.6.32-279.19.1.el6.x86_64, JDK 1.7.0_13 and Hadoop 1.0.4. Sort benchmarks were run against a 500GB dataset.

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Exploring the Potential Applications of Graphene-Based Devices

Graphene is both strong and lightweight, providing many potential applications of graphene-based electrical and structural devices. Thanks to COMSOL Multiphysics®, with its state-of-the-art solvers, optimized by Intel® to run on their processors, simulating such applications is now straightforward.

 

 

What is graphene?

 

In short, graphene is a special type of material made up of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. It was discovered in its stable form at the University of Manchester in 2003, leading to Nobel Prizes in 2010 for the two researchers who discovered the material. Since 2004, when graphene was originally isolated in its planar form using adhesive tape, the race has been on to mass-produce the material utilizing economical fabrication techniques. These days, a more popular method involves performing epitaxial growth on silicon carbide by heating it to high temperatures at very low pressures. There are plenty of other techniques out there as well, all accompanied by their own advantages and limitations. As I mentioned, graphene is both strong and lightweight – to be more specific, it is about 200 times stronger than steel and weighs less than 1 milligram per square meter. Furthermore, compared to copper, graphene has a higher electrical and thermal conductivity. This can be attributed to the unusually high room temperature electron mobility of 15,000 cm2/(V-s).

 

 

Introducing a Band Gap Into Graphene

 

Researchers have attempted to use graphene as a replacement for silicon in semiconductor devices. The problem with graphene in its unaltered form is that it does not have a band gap. This means that, if used in a fast electrical switch (like a MOSFET), there is no way to turn the current off. The basic idea is to chemically modify the graphene so that it retains its unusually high mobility, but introduces a band gap to make it behave like a semiconductor.

 

In simple terms, the idea of a MOSFET is to apply a gate voltage to control the drain-to-source resistance and thus the drain current, as such:

 

comsolpic1.png

At a certain gate-to-source voltage (VGS), and at low drain-to-source voltages (VDS), the drain current is almost linearly dependent on VDS. When VDS increases, the drain current saturates. The saturation level is dependent on the gate-to-source voltage, while the switching time is dependent on the semiconductor’s mobility. In other words, the higher the mobility of the semiconducting material, the faster the current can be switched on and off.

 

The fact that the room temperature electron mobility of graphene is an order of magnitude greater than silicon means that lower drain-source voltages can be applied to generate the same electrical current. This results in lower electric fields for the same electrical current, hence less power dissipation (since the power dissipation is the dot product of the current density and electric field). From a thermal management and maintenance cost perspective, this is very attractive. Another advantage of the high electron mobility is that the on/off switch time will be an order of magnitude faster than in the pure silicon case, which is significant in the power electronics industry.

 

Since the physics of semiconductors is rather complicated, the modeling approach most commonly used is to solve a set of drift diffusion equations coupled to Poisson’s equation:

 

comsolpic2.png

Where n = number density of electrons, p = number density of holes, V = electrostatic potential, Rn = electron recombination rate, Rp = hole recombination rate, Jn = electron current, and Jp = hole current.

 

If you solve this set of equations, you can construct the voltage-current characteristics, step response, and efficiency of semiconducting devices. Device engineers who are working on the applications of graphene-based semiconductors can already make “what-if” decisions for how well a specific device will work using appropriate semiconductor device simulation software.

 

 

Manufacturing and Large-Scale Production Issues

 

There are many competing manufacturing methods employed to attempt mass-producing graphene – including exfoliation, epitaxial growth on a suitable substrate, reduction of graphene oxide, pyrolisis, or growth from metal-carbon melts. Another method is the use of thermal decomposition at high vacuum. Engineers might look to simulation in order to design and optimize high-vacuum systems that are suitable for producing graphene. However, there are few modeling tools out there capable of aiding in this, particularly if the system is nonisothermal. As the mean free path of gas molecules become comparable to the length scale of flow, kinetic effects become important. Therefore, conventional fluid dynamics tools cannot be used for modeling gases at low pressures. The pressure on surfaces primarily depends on the line of sight with respect to molecular sources and sinks in the vacuum system.

 

As an example, take the nonisothermal vacuum system described in this thesis on growth of graphene films on Pt(111). The system shown there would inevitably be costly to build, but if design optimizations can be made prior to construction, it would save a lot of money later on. The thesis outlines some estimations on the fluxes onto surfaces and deposition rates, but these do not take the geometry of the system; the notion that different surfaces have different temperatures; or the location of the pumps into consideration.

 

If we were to accurately model nonisothermal molecular flows and deposition rates onto substrates on arbitrarily complicated geometries, we would need to take a sophisticated modeling approach. The flow of gas is determined by collisions with the surfaces in the system because gas molecules interact with surfaces more frequently than they interact with one another. Therefore, we would need to solve a complicated integral equation in order to compute the molecular flux, pressure, heat flux, and number density in the system. The molecular flux can further be used together with a suitable differential equation to determine the deposition rate and the deposited film thickness. This allows different process configurations and concepts to be tested before building the physical process chamber.

 

 

Simulation and Experiments Go Hand-in-Hand

 

The potential improvements in a wide range of today’s devices along with the potential to create new devices, makes graphene too powerful of a substance to ignore. Even though mass-producing graphene in a monetarily and environmentally efficient way is an ongoing process, researchers are already simulating and prototyping graphene-based devices. Due to its unusual properties, any simulation tool should be chosen carefully to fully take into account all the different physical processes that need to be taken into consideration. The characteristics of prototypical graphene-based devices need to be carefully measured, quantified, and compared with the expected performance. In this sense, the simulation and experiments go hand-in-hand – the simulations can provide guidance as to what experiments to perform; the experiments can provide data to validate the simulation, giving confidence that further simulations will reproduce the physical characteristics of the actual device.

 

If you are interested in reading more about graphene, check out the graphene series on the COMSOL Blog.

 

 

COMSOL® is a rapidly growing, high-tech engineering software company, providing solutions for physics-based modeling and simulation. With COMSOL Multiphysics® and the suite of add-on modules, engineers and scientists can simulate any physics-based system. Learn more at http://www.comsol.com/.

 

Daniel Smith received his Masters degree in applied mathematics from the University of St. Andrews in 2002 and a Masters in Numerical computing from the University of Manchester in 2003. Following this, Daniel worked as a scientist at MKS Instruments in the Corporate Advanced Technology group.

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Enter to Win the Intel Network Plaza HP ElitePad 900 Giveaway at IDF13!

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How to Enter:  Complete an entry form for the “Embracing Consumerization” panel with your first name, last name, title, and company name, then drop the entry form into the drawing box provided at Intel Business Client Pavilion in the IDF Technology Showcase before September 11, 2013 at 1600.

 

How to Win:  Winner MUST be present at the Networking Plaza in the IDF Technology Showcase, during Intel drawing to win

 

Official Rules

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Enter to Win the Intel Network Plaza HP ElitePad 900 Giveaway at IDF13!

plaza.png

 

How to Enter:  Complete an entry form for the “Embracing Consumerization” panel with your first name, last name, title, and company name, then drop the entry form into the drawing box provided at Intel Business Client Pavilion in the IDF Technology Showcase before September 11, 2013 at 1600.

 

How to Win:  Winner MUST be present at the Networking Plaza in the IDF Technology Showcase, during Intel drawing to win

 

Official Rules

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How to Accelerate Human Genome Resequencing

Genome resequencing in patients is an important step in the detection of mutation for congenital diseases. Traditionally, genomics software has been run on High Performance Computing (HPC) architectures.

 

Hadoop and MapReduce technologies are slowly transforming the Life Sciences arena by allowing parallel read-mapping algorithms to scale effectively and resulting in shorter execution times and lower costs (from software execution and hardware). Michael Schatz (University of Maryland) and Ben Langmead (John Hopkins University) have introduced various software applications like Crossbow into the Hadoop ecosystem, enabling gene resequencing to run on Hadoop clusters as well as on the cloud (Amazon Web Services via Elastic Map Reduce service). Crossbow provides a scalable software pipeline that can analyze over 35x coverage of the human genome on a 10-node Hadoop cluster in about one day.

 

However, being open source, Hadoop seems less polished in some areas and can be difficult to manage in others. Companies like Intel Corporation have started with the Apache Hadoop Distribution and added components to it for better manageability and performance – optimized for Intel Xeon processors, in order to provide businesses with an open enterprise Hadoop platform for next generation analytics and life sciences, called the Intel® Distribution for Apache Hadoop Software.

 

In this new paper, we demonstrate how to install and configure Crossbow and its required components – Bowtie, SOAPsnp and SRA toolkit within Intel® Hadoop Distribution. Read the full paper here.

 

Technological advancement is far outpacing our knowledge and abilities to interpret genomic information.  However, technology is allowing newer opportunities to interpret more and more information about humans and other animals.

 

What are your thoughts on the usage, benefits and side-effects of these technologies?

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Don’t Miss Matt Royer’s Session on User Experiences at #IDF13

What: BCSS001 4th Generation Intel vPro Platforms: Developing Compelling User Experiences

When: Tuesday, September 10th, 1-2pm

Where: Room 2007, Intel Developer Forum 2013

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Intel platforms are easy to take advantage of. You won’t know just how easy until you attend Matt Royer’s Session BCSS001, on covering 4th Generation with an exciting announcement on Intel vPro Platforms.

 

After attending 6 IDF’s and teaching at the last 4, Matt has a huge passion for cultivating and passing along Intel’s latest technology.

 

Matt will present the new 4th Generation Intel vPro platform with technologies such as Intel Pro Wireless Display, Intel Identity Protection Technology with Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), Indoor Location-Based Services, and more. Explore opportunities to incorporate the latest technologies into your software offerings or IT infrastructure.

 

Two reasons you won’t want to miss Matt’s session:

 

  • You’ll learn how to enhance the experience for your end users significantly using Intel’s latest vPro technology

 

  • Have your questions answered about how this technology can impact your specific field, for an in-depth tailored experience.

 

“With the two classes I’m teaching, my objective is for attendees to see how great Intel Platforms are and how easy it is for developers to take advantage of the associated technologies to deliver business related usages to their customers.”

 

Matt is looking forward to engaging with attendees between presentations, sharing his wealth of knowledge that all will benefit from.

 

Looking forward to meeting Matt in person? Connect with him on LinkedIn here before you meet face to face, and he’ll see you there!

Read more >

Don’t Miss Matt Royer’s Session on User Experiences at #IDF13

What: BCSS001 4th Generation Intel vPro Platforms: Developing Compelling User Experiences

When: Tuesday, September 10th, 1-2pm

Where: Room 2007, Intel Developer Forum 2013

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Intel platforms are easy to take advantage of. You won’t know just how easy until you attend Matt Royer’s Session BCSS001, on covering 4th Generation with an exciting announcement on Intel vPro Platforms.

 

After attending 6 IDF’s and teaching at the last 4, Matt has a huge passion for cultivating and passing along Intel’s latest technology.

 

Matt will present the new 4th Generation Intel vPro platform with technologies such as Intel Pro Wireless Display, Intel Identity Protection Technology with Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), Indoor Location-Based Services, and more. Explore opportunities to incorporate the latest technologies into your software offerings or IT infrastructure.

 

Two reasons you won’t want to miss Matt’s session:

 

  • You’ll learn how to enhance the experience for your end users significantly using Intel’s latest vPro technology

 

  • Have your questions answered about how this technology can impact your specific field, for an in-depth tailored experience.

 

“With the two classes I’m teaching, my objective is for attendees to see how great Intel Platforms are and how easy it is for developers to take advantage of the associated technologies to deliver business related usages to their customers.”

 

Matt is looking forward to engaging with attendees between presentations, sharing his wealth of knowledge that all will benefit from.

 

Looking forward to meeting Matt in person? Connect with him on LinkedIn here before you meet face to face, and he’ll see you there!

Read more >

Three Can’t-Miss Events at #IDF13

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Amongst the many exciting new aspects of the 2013 Intel Developer Forum are live demos of the very latest technologies that can have a direct impact on your area of the business. The Advanced Technology Zone and Business Client Pavilion are potentially two of the most compelling, with each showcasing demos to put the versatility of new Intel technologies on display for a broad range of use cases.

 

Advanced Technology Zone

The Advanced Technology Zone showcases the leading technology delivered by the PC Client Group, including the Business Client Platform Division. Experience this business-focused, cutting-edge technology: Intel® Pro Wireless Display and Intel® Identity Protection Technology with PKI, and Intel® Small Business Advantage.

 

Business Client Pavilion

Come to the Business Client Pavilion to see the end-to-end features of the new 4th generation Intel® Core™ vPro™ processor. See our four areas of execution with compelling demos that dive deep into our business use cases. Technologies include Intel® Indoor Location Based Services, Intel® Pro Wireless Display, Intel® IPT with PKI, Intel ProSeries SSDs, and stylish & robust form factors.

 

Formal Sessions You Won’t Want to Miss

Formalized sessions are also not to be missed, and include three can’t-miss overviews on the latest Intel technology:

 

  • 4th Gen Intel vPro Platforms: Developing Compelling User Experiences (Session BCSS001). This session will present the new 4th Generation Intel® vPro platform with various new technologies. Explore opportunities to incorporate the latest technologies into your software offerings or IT infrastructure. Session will be presented by Matt Royer & Perry Vincent.
  • Tablet Solutions in Business: Build On Intel Technologies for Differentiation (Session BCSS002). Get an exclusive look at how applications can differentiate the usage of the tablet and the many ingredients that make up the soon to be released tablet platform. Session will be presented by Abdul Bailey, Breck Parkinson, & Matt Royer.
  • Intel Setup and Configuration Software: Discover & Configure Intel vPro Platforms (Session BCSS003). See how software developers and IT engineers can take advantage of Intel Setup and Configuration Software (Intel SCS) to discover and configure Intel vPro platforms. Session will be presented by Dan Brunton & Dena Lumbang.

 

 

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Use the hashtag #IDF13 to connect with attendees before, during and after the event and visit IDF online for more details. We look forward to seeing you there!

Read more >

Three Can’t-Miss Events at #IDF13

intel-idf-moscone-west-full.jpg

Amongst the many exciting new aspects of the 2013 Intel Developer Forum are live demos of the very latest technologies that can have a direct impact on your area of the business. The Advanced Technology Zone and Business Client Pavilion are potentially two of the most compelling, with each showcasing demos to put the versatility of new Intel technologies on display for a broad range of use cases.

 

Advanced Technology Zone

The Advanced Technology Zone showcases the leading technology delivered by the PC Client Group, including the Business Client Platform Division. Experience this business-focused, cutting-edge technology: Intel® Pro Wireless Display and Intel® Identity Protection Technology with PKI, and Intel® Small Business Advantage.

 

Business Client Pavilion

Come to the Business Client Pavilion to see the end-to-end features of the new 4th generation Intel® Core™ vPro™ processor. See our four areas of execution with compelling demos that dive deep into our business use cases. Technologies include Intel® Indoor Location Based Services, Intel® Pro Wireless Display, Intel® IPT with PKI, Intel ProSeries SSDs, and stylish & robust form factors.

 

Formal Sessions You Won’t Want to Miss

Formalized sessions are also not to be missed, and include three can’t-miss overviews on the latest Intel technology:

 

  • 4th Gen Intel vPro Platforms: Developing Compelling User Experiences (Session BCSS001). This session will present the new 4th Generation Intel® vPro platform with various new technologies. Explore opportunities to incorporate the latest technologies into your software offerings or IT infrastructure. Session will be presented by Matt Royer & Perry Vincent.
  • Tablet Solutions in Business: Build On Intel Technologies for Differentiation (Session BCSS002). Get an exclusive look at how applications can differentiate the usage of the tablet and the many ingredients that make up the soon to be released tablet platform. Session will be presented by Abdul Bailey, Breck Parkinson, & Matt Royer.
  • Intel Setup and Configuration Software: Discover & Configure Intel vPro Platforms (Session BCSS003). See how software developers and IT engineers can take advantage of Intel Setup and Configuration Software (Intel SCS) to discover and configure Intel vPro platforms. Session will be presented by Dan Brunton & Dena Lumbang.

 

 

Blog.png

 

 

Use the hashtag #IDF13 to connect with attendees before, during and after the event and visit IDF online for more details. We look forward to seeing you there!

Read more >

Citrix XenClient XT and Intel vPro Combine for Mission Critical Security

18312140_l.jpgA recent article in Gov’t Computer News (GCN) highlights a “Ground breaking” solution known as SecureView.  In the past, to meet requirements for security, government agencies have had to deploy multiple different computer systems on to an analyst’s desk, each connected to a different network with different requirements for security.  SecureView vastly simplified this scenario, without compromising security or performance.

 

It’s important to note that SecureView is based on Citrix XenClient XT.  XenClient XT uses a type one, or bare metal hypervisor.  SecureView is also designed to run on Intel vPro Technology, which provides both the performance and underlying hardware enhanced security. With XenClient XT and Intel vPro technology as the foundation, SecureView provides a level of security required by key government agencies.

 

The author mentions that SecureView had to “meet seemingly conflicting security and performance requirements.”  Because SecureView uses a bare metal hypervisor it provides two important benefits.  First, on startup, Intel vPro Technology provides a hardware based trusted boot.  This hardware root of trust provides an extra measure of protection against threats like root kits and other malware.  Second, because the type 1 hypervisor runs directly on hardware it’s able to deliver outstanding performance.

 

As mentioned, SecureView is based on Citrix XenClient XT and Intel vPro Technology.  You can see XenClient XT running on the latest Intel vPro Technology at the Intel Developer Forum being held in San Francisco from September 10th to 12th. Look for the Citrix booth in the Business Client Zone on the demo floor at IDF.  And while you’re there be sure to check out the other new capabilities and new Ultrabook 2 in 1 designs.

 

Follow all of the action at #IDF13 on @IntelITS and see what to expect at IDF 2013 in this short video from Intel Corp.

Read more >

Citrix XenClient XT and Intel vPro Combine for Mission Critical Security

18312140_l.jpgA recent article in Gov’t Computer News (GCN) highlights a “Ground breaking” solution known as SecureView.  In the past, to meet requirements for security, government agencies have had to deploy multiple different computer systems on to an analyst’s desk, each connected to a different network with different requirements for security.  SecureView vastly simplified this scenario, without compromising security or performance.

 

It’s important to note that SecureView is based on Citrix XenClient XT.  XenClient XT uses a type one, or bare metal hypervisor.  SecureView is also designed to run on Intel vPro Technology, which provides both the performance and underlying hardware enhanced security. With XenClient XT and Intel vPro technology as the foundation, SecureView provides a level of security required by key government agencies.

 

The author mentions that SecureView had to “meet seemingly conflicting security and performance requirements.”  Because SecureView uses a bare metal hypervisor it provides two important benefits.  First, on startup, Intel vPro Technology provides a hardware based trusted boot.  This hardware root of trust provides an extra measure of protection against threats like root kits and other malware.  Second, because the type 1 hypervisor runs directly on hardware it’s able to deliver outstanding performance.

 

As mentioned, SecureView is based on Citrix XenClient XT and Intel vPro Technology.  You can see XenClient XT running on the latest Intel vPro Technology at the Intel Developer Forum being held in San Francisco from September 10th to 12th. Look for the Citrix booth in the Business Client Zone on the demo floor at IDF.  And while you’re there be sure to check out the other new capabilities and new Ultrabook 2 in 1 designs.

 

Follow all of the action at #IDF13 on @IntelITS and see what to expect at IDF 2013 in this short video from Intel Corp.

Read more >